NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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Are SuperPACs Good For Democracy?

Sep 18, 2012
Originally published on September 18, 2012 1:44 pm

Money is flowing through this election season like never before. The proliferation is due in part to the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision and other recent rulings, which paved the way for superPACs, other outside groups and massive, secret donations from individuals, corporations and unions.

Those in favor of fewer regulations argue it's a matter of free speech, one that requires funding to be heard. They consider limiting spending a way of also controlling speech. But others say spending has gotten out of hand, drowning out constituents who don't have much money and even corrupting the political process.

A panel of experts took on the issue in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate. They faced off two against two in an Oxford-style debate on the motion, "Money In Politics Is Still Overregulated."

Before the debate, 19 percent of the audience supported the motion, and 63 percent were against. Eighteen percent were undecided. Afterward, 22 percent were in favor, while 69 percent disagreed — making those arguing against the motion the winners.

The Sept. 12 debate was moderated by ABC News' John Donvan. Those debating were:

FOR THE MOTION

David Keating is president of the Center for Competitive Politics. He has served as executive director of Club for Growth, a group dedicated to economic freedom; executive vice president of the National Taxpayers Union; and executive director of Americans for Fair Taxation, a group that supports the "FairTax" to replace the income tax.

Jacob Sullum is a senior editor at Reason magazine and Reason.com. His weekly column, distributed by Creators Syndicate, is carried by newspapers across the U.S., including the New York Post and the Chicago Sun-Times. Sullum is the author of Saying Yes: In Defense of Drug Use (2003) and For Your Own Good: The Anti-Smoking Crusade and the Tyranny of Public Health (1998). In 2004, he received the Thomas S. Szasz Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Cause of Civil Liberties and in 2005 he received the Drug Policy Alliance's Edward M. Brecher Award for Achievement in the Field of Journalism.

AGAINST THE MOTION

Trevor Potter is a former commissioner (1991–1995) and chairman (1994) of the U.S. Federal Election Commission. He is the founder, president and general counsel of the Campaign Legal Center. Potter served as general counsel to the 2000 and 2008 presidential campaigns of John McCain. He is also an attorney at Caplin & Drysdale, where he leads the firm's political law practice. He is also notable for appearing on the television program The Colbert Report to discuss the founding and progress of the Colbert superPAC.

Jonathan Soros is chief executive officer of JS Capital Management, a private investment firm. He is also a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, a think tank based in New York City. Soros is a member of the Next Generation Leadership Board of the Indian School of Business and holds several board positions affiliated with the Open Society Foundations. Prior to founding JS Capital, Soros worked with Soros Fund Management. Soros has clerked for Judge Stephen F. Williams of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit; served as assistant director of the International Foundation for Electoral Systems' mission to Moldova; and co-founded the Fair Trial Initiative, a nonprofit that seeks to improve the quality of defense available to defendants facing the death penalty.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.