Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Another Senate Campaign Could See SuperPAC Truce (Or Not)

Feb 9, 2012
Originally published on February 9, 2012 11:48 am

It might seem like the equivalent of trying to bail the ocean with a bucket but we now have another major race, the U.S. Senate race in Montana, in which the idea of a self-imposed truce by the candidates on superPAC money in the race has come up.

Sen. Jon Tester, a Democrat, sent a letter to Rep. Denny Rehberg, the Republican who seeks to unseat him, requesting a truce on outside money funding negative ads for their campaigns, meaning superPACs.

"Let's reject and work to keep all third-party radio ads about you and me out of Montana. Let's reject efforts by outside groups to undermine Montana's tradition of elections decided by people — not corporations."

Tester, a first-term senator, has proposed a constitutional amendment that would overturn the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision that allows corporations and unions to make unlimited contributions to superPACs among other groups.

Politico reported the response from Rehberg's campaign manager:

"This is certainly an interesting proposal by Sen. Tester," said Rehberg campaign manager Erik Iverson. "We are going to give it a close look and we will respond in due course."

That response doesn't exactly sound like they intend to be boxed in by the deadline Tester provides in letter where he says the offer is on the table until 5pm Friday, MST.

Sen. Scott Brown, a Republican, and his Democratic challenger, Elizabeth Warren, have agreed to a similar truce in the Massachusetts race for the U.S. Senate. To enforce their deal, any campaign that benefits from a superPAC's ad must make a charitable contribution of half the ad buy within three days.

But the agreement doesn't place constraints on get-out-the-vote efforts which can be costly and spell the difference between a candidate winning or losing.

A New York Times story on Foster Friess, the billionaire helping to bankroll the Red,White and Blue Fund, a superPAC supporting Rick Santorum's campaign, mentions that the superPAC helped to get voters to their caucus locations in the Denver area.

In a report on the GOP superPAC American Crossroads on Morning Edition by NPR correspondent Peter Overby, Steve Law, the group's CEO, extolled the issues platform the group has issued, which presumably would give Republican candidates a ready-made template for their campaigns.

So the help these superPACs extend to political campaigns goes beyond paying for negative ads, though that's not to diminish their role in that activity.

Meanwhile, there's a study out this week on superPACs by Demos and U.S. PIRG, left-of-center advocacy groups that examine just how much superPACs are a game for the wealthy. An excerpt from the report called "Auctioning Democracy":

"SuperPACs are tools used by wealthy individuals and institutions to dominate the political process. Ninety-three percent of the itemized funds raised by superPACs from individuals came in contributions of at least $10,000, from just twenty-three out of every 10 million people in the U.S. population."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.