"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Pages

And Now For The Lighter Side Of Egypt's Revolution

Jun 18, 2012
Originally published on June 18, 2012 9:48 am

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is wrapping up his Revolutionary Road Trip, a journey of more than 2,700 miles across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team have traveled from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya, and filed this report from the third and final country, Egypt.

When Egyptians completed the first round of their presidential election last month, an online news website featured the following headline: "Election results disrupt bodily functions among millions of Egyptians."

El Koshary Today may be Egypt's closest counterpart to The Onion, the satirical American news website.

Two founders of El Koshary Today invited us to their table at a central Cairo bar named Hurriya, which means freedom. It is the plainest of places, with concrete floor and wooden chairs.

The bartender doesn't ask if you want a beer; he just delivers green bottles of an Egyptian brand, Stella.

One of the founders is Hazem Zohny, 27, who writes the satirical paper part time while finishing a masters degree.

Zohny says he mocks the news because he finds it depressing. A recent El Koshary headline quoted the government saying, "Complaining to strangers may lead to annihilation."

It may sound absurd, but it's really just tweaking an actual message by the government, which ran ads warning Egyptians not to talk with foreigners.

No Shortage Of Material

Zohny's co-writer and childhood friend, Taha Belal, has also thought of his own ads as religious conservatives press for more power in Egyptian society.

"I wanted to make an ad — we have this little section for ads — so I wanted to make a Head and Shoulders ad for beards," says Belal. Maybe the dandruff shampoo can help people who show their faith by growing long beards.

"I feel like it's going to be more marketable these days," Belal says.

The growing presence of religious conservatives has prompted the owners of this bar to nail boards over the windows so that devout passers-by won't have to see the beer.

It's a good thing, because eight empty bottles somehow accumulated on our table. We also had some lemon chili-flavored chips.

It's fitting that we talked over some food, because El Koshary Today is named after a common Egyptian dish: basically a bowl of spaghetti with a lot of things added.

"Koshary is sort of a very reflective meal of the country in the sense that it's a very chaotic kind of meal," Zohny says.

The plate can offer a mix of lentils, pasta, rice, chickpeas and more.

Competition In Writing Parody

El Koshary Today does not publish daily — only when inspiration strikes.

The 2011 revolution gave the paper plenty of fodder, as did this year's elections, which led to Zohny's headline about disrupting Egyptian bodily functions.

"I think this was not so much satirical as a real kind of news report," he says. "The level of shock was really quite overwhelming."

A Muslim Brotherhood politician, Mohammed Morsi, was in the presidential runoff held Saturday and Sunday, facing a military-backed candidate, Ahmed Shafiq.

Zohny recalls a journalist who recently wrote, "The political situation in Egypt has rendered parody news obsolete."

Zohny sees the truth in this. "It is getting really hard to come up with parody news because the news has become a parody," he says.

And there are other challenges as well, Zohny and Belal say.

Egyptian parody has exploded, appearing so swiftly on the Internet after every news event that El Koshary Today knows it will have to write something good to compete.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the two Egyptian presidential candidates made this past weekend's runoff by surviving a first round of voting. And when the first- round results were known, an online news site featured the following headline: Election Results Disrupt Bodily Functions Among Millions of Egyptians. That news site is El Koshary Today. It may be Egypt's closest counterpart to The Onion, the satirical American news source.

During our Revolutionary Road Trip through North Africa, we asked to meet the founders of El Koshary Today, and two of them invited us to their table at a central Cairo bar.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHATTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF CLINKING BOTTLES)

INSKEEP: The bar is called Hurriya, which means freedom. It is the plainest of places - concrete floor, wooden chairs. The bartender doesn't ask if you want a beer. He just delivers green bottles of an Egyptian brand, Stella. One of the El Koshary founders is Hazem Zahny, who's 27 years old, and writes the satirical paper part time.

HAZEM ZAHNY: I'm sort of a full-time bad back sufferer, part-time science journalist. I'm also finishing up my master's.

INSKEEP: What happened to your back?

ZAHNY: A good old disc problem.

INSKEEP: Is this Stella beer kind of an anesthetic for that?

ZAHNY: Stella beer is more of an anesthetic for life more generally, I think.

INSKEEP: He says he mocks the news because he finds it depressing. A recent El Koshary headline quoted the government, saying: Complaining To Strangers May Lead To Annihilation. Sounds absurd, but the government actually said almost that - running ads warning Egyptians not to talk with foreigners. Hazem's co-writer and childhood friend, Taha Belal, who's an artist, has been thinking of ads of his own as religious conservatives press for more power in Egyptian society.

TAHA BELAL: I wanted to make an ad - we have this little section for ads - so I wanted to make a Head and Shoulders ad for beards, for example.

(LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: Maybe the dandruff shampoo can help people who show their faith by growing long beards.

BELAL: It's going to be, you know, more marketable.

INSKEEP: Religious conservatives has recently affected this bar, prompting the owners to nail boards over the windows so that devout passers-by won't have to see the beer. It's a good thing, because eight empty bottles somehow accumulated on our table.

ZAHNY: Have some chips. You guys want - these are lemon-chili.

INSKEEP: Lemon-chili chips. I'd better try one.

(SOUNDBITE OF CRUNCHING)

INSKEEP: It's fitting that we talked over some food, since El Koshary Today is named after a common Egyptian dish - basically, a bowl of spaghetti with a lot of things added.

ZAHNY: Koshary is sort of a very reflective meal of the country, in the sense that it's already quite a - chaotic kind of meal.

INSKEEP: A mix of lentils, pasta, rice, chick peas and more. El Koshary Today does not publish daily; only when inspiration strikes. The 2011 revolution gave plenty of inspiration, as did this year's elections - which led to that headline about disrupting Egyptian bodily functions.

OK, whose headline was that?

Hazem raises his hand.

ZAHNY: Yeah. I mean, I think this - to a large extent, was not so much satirical as a real kind of news report, to an extent. I mean, the level of shock was really, quite overwhelming.

INSKEEP: Centrist candidates were eliminated in favor of the two polarizing choices that Egyptians faced this past weekend. Hazem recalls a journalist who recently wrote: The political situation in Egypt has rendered parody news obsolete.

ZAHNY: This is so true, to an extent. I mean, it is getting really hard to come up with parody news because news has become parody.

INSKEEP: The Associated Press correspondent doing this straightforward story has the parody far quicker than...

ZAHNY: Absolutely. I'll give you an example. Yesterday, this big news item said this new party, called Democratic Jihad, supports Shafik, right? Shafik, who wants to destroy...

INSKEEP: Supports the military guy...

ZAHNY: Yeah. And if you read that, you think on the one level, it's just hilarious - the term democratic jihad, and all the connotations associated with that. And then you add another level - that they support the anti-Islamist candidate - and you think, what the hell is going on here? It's brilliant.

INSKEEP: Though they find such news items dismaying, Hazem and Taha say there's an upside. The amount of Egyptian parody has exploded, appearing so swiftly on the Internet after every news event that El Koshary Today now struggles to write something good enough to compete.

You'll find all of our reporting from the road through Tunisia, Libya and Egypt at NPR.org. It's NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.