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Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Ancient Deep-Sea Bacteria Are In No Hurry To Eat

May 17, 2012
Originally published on May 17, 2012 7:16 pm

Back when the dinosaurs ruled the Earth, some hardy bacteria took up residence at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Eighty six million years later, they're still there. And a new study says they're living out the most Spartan lifestyle known on this planet.

They live in a place called the Pacific Gyre, where almost nothing reaches the seafloor. Nutrients from the world's rivers don't get out that far. Most plankton that die in the water dissolve long before any pieces of them can reach the seafloor far below. It's a rare day indeed when even a single particle lands in any given spot on the bottom.

"If you imagine that a grain of sediment falls on the surface, it will take a thousand years before the next grain will sit on top of it," says Hans Roy at Aarhus University in Denmark.

As a result, it has taken millions of years for a thin layer of sediment to form.

Roy was part of an expedition in 2009 to sample that ancient sediment. And amazingly enough, he found living bacteria buried in that clay. That's amazing because there are almost no nutrients down there for them to feed on.

"They left the surface 86 million years ago with one lunch box, and they're still eating out of it," Roy says. "It's like they're splitting a pie, and they keep splitting in half and in half and in half, but nobody ever eats the last crumble. It's quite remarkable."

Roy and colleagues report their find in the latest Science magazine. They say these bacteria may have the world's slowest metabolism, with barely enough oxygen and nutrients to keep them alive.

"I weigh 140 pounds, and I eat a few pounds of food every day, so it will take me a month or two to eat my own weight," Roy says. "These organisms will take a thousand years to eat their own weight."

'In Our Eyes It Looks Like Suspended Animation'

Roy can't say exactly how old the individual bacteria he studies are. They may have been reproducing extremely slowly since the time of the dinosaurs. Or the individuals could be millions of years old, rebuilding themselves just fast enough to repair the inevitable damage of aging.

In any case, these microscopic life-forms have life cycles that defy human intuition.

"That's so much slower than our own, that in our eyes it looks like suspended animation," Roy says. "This is pretty much like if you would stand up and look at a tree to see if it grows at all, you won't see anything because you're looking at the wrong time scale."

Happily, nature has run that experiment on the seafloor.

One reason scientists are interested in this extreme lifestyle is because it provides clues about the absolute minimum conditions required to sustain life. Andreas Teske, a marine microbiologist at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, says that's useful for people looking beyond our planet for signs of life.

"We would like to know how far down can we go with respect to energy supply for life," says Teske. "So we have to look at the most difficult places for life on Earth. And the deep subsurface is certainly one of these most difficult, and at the same time — just by volume, by space, by extent — one of the most dominant places on Earth."

So these bacteria are likely quite abundant, and they're very likely to be here long after we're gone.

"These organisms have no clue that we're even around," Roy says. "They could be sitting down there for 100 million years, and the whole surface could be one scorched desert, and they still wouldn't know it."

On the other hand, we, presumably, have more fun.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Back when dinosaurs ruled the Earth, some hardy bacteria took up residence in the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Eighty-six million years later, they are still there. And the new study says they are living the most Spartan lifestyle known on this planet.

NPR's Richard Harris has that story.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: Out in the middle of the ocean there's a place called the Pacific Gyre where almost nothing reaches the seafloor. Nutrients from the world's rivers don't get out that far. Most plankton that die in the water dissolve long before they can reach the seafloor far below.

Hans Roy says it's a rare day indeed when even a single particle lands in any given spot on the bottom.

HANS ROY: If you imagine that a grain of sediment falls on the surface, it will take a thousand years before the next grain will sit on top of it.

HARRIS: As a result, it has taken millions of years for a thin layer of sediment to form.

Roy, from Aarhus University in Denmark, was part of an expedition in 2009 to sample that ancient sediment. And amazingly enough, he found living bacteria buried in that clay. Amazing because there are almost no nutrients down there for them to feed on.

ROY: They left the surface 86 million years ago with one lunch box, and they're still eating out of it. It's like they're splitting a pie and they just keep splitting in half, and in half and in half, but nobody ever eats the last crumble. It's quite remarkable.

HARRIS: Roy says in the latest Science magazine that those bacteria may have the world's slowest metabolism, with barely enough oxygen and nutrients to keep them alive. He talks about his own food intake by way of comparison.

ROY: I weigh 140 pounds and I eat a few pounds of food every day. So it will take me a month or two to eat my own weight. These organisms will take a thousand years to eat their own weight.

HARRIS: Roy can't say exactly how old the individual bacteria he studies are. They may have been reproducing extremely slowly since the time of the dinosaurs. Or the individuals could be millions of years old, rebuilding themselves just fast enough to repair the inevitable damage of aging.

In any case, these microscopic life forms have lifecycles that defy human intuition.

ROY: That's so much slower than our own, that in our eyes it looks like suspended animation. This is pretty much like if you would stand up and look at a tree to see if it grows at all, you won't see anything because you're just looking at the wrong time scale.

HARRIS: But if you could stand there a hundred years, you would see something.

ROY: Definitely, but my contract runs until October.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

HARRIS: Happily, nature has run that experiment on the seafloor. And one reason scientists are interested in this extreme lifestyle is because it provides clues about the absolute minimum conditions required to sustain life.

Andreas Teske, at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, says that's useful for people looking beyond our planet for signs of life.

ANDREAS TESKE: We would like to know how far down can we go with respect to energy supply for life. So we have to look at the most difficult places on Earth. And the deep subsurface is certainly one of these most difficult, and at the same time - just by volume, by space, by extent - one of the most dominant places on Earth.

HARRIS: So these bacteria are likely quite abundant. And Hans Roy from Denmark says they're very likely to be here long after we're gone.

ROY: These organisms have no clue that we're even around. They could be sitting down there for 100 million years, the whole surface could be one scorched desert, and they still wouldn't know it.

HARRIS: On the other hand, we, presumably, have more fun.

Richard Harris, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.