The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The middle of summer is when the surprises in publishing turn up. I'm talking about those quietly commanding books that publishers tend to put out now, because fall and winter are focused on big books by established authors. Which brings us to The Dream Life of Astronauts, by Patrick Ryan, a very funny and touching collection of nine short stories that take place in the 1960s and '70s around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

The June 23 Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the troubled Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant — a huge, steam-belching facility that has long been the town's biggest employer.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

At least that's one premise of the Allen Brain Observatory, which launched Wednesday and lets anyone with an Internet connection study a mouse brain as it responds to visual information.

The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

"Following one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in our history," the FBI's Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement, "the FBI redirected resources allocated to the D.B. Cooper case in order to focus on other investigative priorities."

This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

Pages

Amid Egypt's Divisive Climate, Kerry Urges Economic Action

Mar 3, 2013
Originally published on March 3, 2013 11:27 am

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walked into a chaotic situation in Egypt, the first Arab country he's visited in his new role. The country is in economic and political turmoil, and he is trying Sunday to encourage Islamist President Mohamed Morsi to open up the political process and carry out much-needed reforms. After their meeting, he announced the U.S. would release $190 million in aid to Egypt.

Kerry has also been hearing complaints from opposition figures, who have vowed to boycott upcoming elections.

He is making it clear he didn't come to lecture, but rather to consult — to help Egypt, a key Arab partner, get through difficult times. The road to democracy, he says, is a long one.

"I say with both humility and with a great deal of respect, that getting there requires a genuine give-and-take among Egypt's political leaders and civil society groups, just as we are continuing to struggle with that in our own country," he says.

Kerry argued that coming together to handle the country's economic crisis was particularly urgent.

A Push For 'Reconciliation'

He met Saturday with opposition figures in a group setting at his hotel in Cairo. Among them was Mohammed el-Orabi, who briefly served as foreign minister and is now the deputy chairman of the Congress Party.

"We will boycott the upcoming election, and we told him that," el-Orabi says.

He says Kerry didn't ask them to change their minds, but that he promised to urge President Mohammed Morsi to allow free and fair elections.

"In the meantime, he was also very strong ... that Egypt should start to rebuild its economy very soon," el-Orabi says. "Otherwise, it will be a failed state, and this might give some ... potential to real chaos in this country."

Also in attendance was Anwar Esmat Sadat of the Reform and Development Party, a nephew of the late Egyptian leader Anwar Sadat. Sadat says he listened carefully to Kerry's thoughts about Egypt's fractious politics.

"There has to be sort of reconciliation. There has to be a united [Egypt], so we can go through these difficult times that we have," Sadat says. "So he's been ... quite helpful in listening and also giving his advice."

Waiting On Inclusion

Not everyone Kerry invited showed up, and some protesters elsewhere in Cairo were reportedly burning pictures of the secretary, accusing him of supporting Egypt's Islamist government.

But Kerry seemed calm in the face of this, telling reporters traveling with him that he heard very passionate perspectives from Egyptians who are committed to the democracy they fought for in their revolution.

"There was a divergency of views in terms of the adamancy, but they all shared a sense that they need to be more a part of the process, more included," Kerry said. "They recognize the economic challenge, but they believe there's a need to fulfill the promise of democracy. And so do we. We believe that, too."

In Need Of Funds

But Kerry is urging all actors in Egypt — from the Islamist government to secular opposition — to come together to deal with their economic woes first. He says it is "paramount, essential, urgent" that the Egyptian economy gets back on its feet.

Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohammed Kamel Amr says his country is counting on the U.S. to help.

"We expect from friends, particularly the United States, to stand by Egypt during this period," he says.

Egypt is already one of the largest recipients of U.S. aid, most of it military. Kerry says he wants to do more to support small businesses and trade.

He's trying to encourage the Egyptian government, though, to take the steps needed to reach a deal with the International Monetary Fund that would bring in $4.8 billion to the country. U.S. officials say it would also unlock more U.S. aid.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Secretary of State John Kerry walked into a chaotic situation in Cairo, Egypt, the first Arab country he's visited since becoming secretary of state. The country is in economic and political turmoil. And today, he tried to encourage the Islamist president, Mohamed Morsi, to open up the political process. After their meeting, Secretary Kerry announced the U.S. would release $190 million in aid to Egypt.

As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, Kerry has also been hearing a lot of complaints from opposition figures, who have vowed to boycott upcoming elections.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Kerry is making clear he didn't come to lecture but to consult, to help Egypt, a key Arab partner get through these difficult times. The road to democracy, he says, is a long one.

SECRETARY JOHN KERRY: And I say with both humility and with a great deal of respect that getting there requires a genuine give and take among Egypt's political leaders and civil society groups just as we are continuing to struggle with that in our own country.

KELEMEN: He sat down with a few opposition figures, those who agreed to meet him in a group setting at his hotel in Cairo. Among them Mohamed El Oraby, who briefly served as foreign minister and is now the deputy chairman of the Congress Party.

MOHAMED EL ORABY: We will boycott the upcoming election and we told him that.

KELEMEN: He says Kerry didn't ask them to change their minds but promised to urge President Mohamed Morsi, behind closed doors, to allow a free and fair elections.

ORABY: In the meantime, he was also very strong in order that Egypt should start to rebuild its economy very soon, otherwise it will be a failed state and this might give some, I would say, potential to real chaos in this country.

KELEMEN: Another politician who attended the meeting, Anwar Essmat El Sadat, of the Reform and Development Party, and a nephew of the late Egyptian leader Anwar Sadat, says he listened carefully to Kerry's thoughts about Egypt's fractious politics.

ANWAR ESSMAT EL SADAT: There has to be sort of reconciliation. There has to be a united Egyptian. You know? So we can go through these difficult times we have. So he have been, you know, quite, you know, helpful on listening and also giving his advice.

KELEMEN: Not everyone Kerry invited showed up and some protesters elsewhere in Cairo were reportedly burning pictures of the secretary, accusing him of supporting the Islamist government here. But Kerry seemed calm in the face of this, telling reporters traveling with him that he heard very passionate views from Egyptians who are committed to the democracy they fought for in their revolution.

KERRY: There was a divergency of views in terms of the adamancy. But they all shared a sense that they need to be more a part of the process, more included. And they recognize the economic challenge but they believe there's also a need to fill the promise of democracy. And so do we, we believe that too.

KELEMEN: But he's urging all actors in Egypt - from the Islamist government to secular opposition - to come together to deal with their economic woes first. Kerry says it is, quote, "paramount, essential, urgent that the Egyptian economy get back on its feet."

Egypt's Foreign Minister Mohammed Amr says on this issue his country is counting on the U.S. to help.

MOHAMMED AMR: (Foreign language spoken)

KELEMEN: We expect from friends, particularly the United States, to stand by Egypt during this period, Amr says.

Egypt is already one of the largest recipients of U.S. aid - most of it military. Kerry says he wants to do more to support small businesses and trade. He's trying to encourage the Egyptian government, though, to take the steps needed to reach a deal with the International Monetary Fund. That would bring in $4.8 billion to the country and U.S. officials say it would unlock more U.S. aid.

Michele Kelemen, NPR News, Cairo. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.