Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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Pages

An American Soccer Coach In Egypt's National Court

Mar 14, 2012
Originally published on March 14, 2012 12:24 pm

Anti-Americanism is on the rise in Egypt these days. A highly publicized trial is under way in Cairo against U.S.-funded pro-democracy groups, and Egyptians are making it clear they reject any American involvement in their country's affairs.

There's one exception, however: an American living in Cairo whom Egyptians are counting on to shake things up. His name is Bob Bradley, and he's the New Jersey-born coach of Egypt's struggling national soccer team.

What many Egyptians admire about Bradley, who coached the U.S. men's national team until last year, is his hands-on approach, says youth coach and soccer expert Diaa Salah. He says the 53-year-old American is trying to improve the agility and fitness of the Egyptian players to help them qualify for the World Cup in 2014.

"He's not a typical suit-and-tie coach," Salah says. "No, he gets his track suit on and gets down on the pitch with the players. He likes to get involved in all of the situations on the pitch. That gives a very good message to the players themselves."

It's a message that Bradley relies on his Arabic-speaking assistants to translate for his players, most of whom don't speak English. But what Bradley lacks in foreign-language skills, his supporters say he makes up for by embracing Egyptian culture and living among them in a popular Cairo neighborhood, rather than in a walled compound.

"He's not one of those coaches who likes to keep distance; no, he wants to be right in the middle of things," Salah says. "I think Egyptians do like [and] are very warm and welcoming to coaches like that."

Bradley says he's gratified by how Egyptians have welcomed him and his wife, Lindsay, since he took over the national team here last October.

"We recognize how proud Egyptians are of their country, their history, of their culture, and people have really reached out to us in a way that we feel very appreciative," Bradley says.

How long the warm reception will last is unclear.

The Road Ahead

In downtown Cairo, passerby Ahmed Adel expressed his frustration with the lackluster performance of the team in recent months. He and others here say Bradley has big shoes to fill, as his Egyptian predecessor, Hassan Shehata, led the Egyptians to three Africa Cup titles.

The American coach also faces major hurdles his predecessors haven't.

Egypt's unprecedented popular uprising that forced Hosni Mubarak from power and the continuing struggle between his military allies and emerging democratic forces here have weakened many of the country's institutions, including its soccer league.

An even more devastating blow came last month with a fatal riot that killed 74 soccer fans after a game in the northern city of Port Said. It was the worst such tragedy in Egyptian history and led officials to cancel league games for the rest of this year.

Bradley says it has also limited his opportunities to scout for new talent.

"There are probably 10 to 12 players that we would have considered for the camp that we have right now, had this incident not taken place," he says.

As of this month, the Egyptian team dropped to its lowest world ranking ever — 64th place, compared to ninth place two years ago. But Bradley says he's not giving up.

"I made it very clear that the national team will need to have camps and will need to find a way to play matches, especially when you consider that the league will not start up again," he says.

His players are training in Egypt and abroad, like in Qatar, where the Egyptian national team recently won 5-0 in a friendly game against Kenya.

The Egyptian team's captain, Ahmed Hassan, says he predicts that with their American coach's drive and the Egyptian players' confidence, the national team will recover.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We've told you in recent days of anti-Americanism rising in Egypt. A trial is underway in Cairo against U.S.-funded pro democracy groups. But this trend does not include an American living in Cairo. Egyptians are counting on this American to bring a change, only a little less vital than Egypt's revolution. Bob Bradley is the New Jersey born coach of Egypt's struggling national soccer team. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF WHISTLE)

BOB BRADLEY: One more time. Go ahead.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: What many Egyptians admire about Bob Bradley is his hands-on approach to coaching, says youth coach and soccer expert, Diaa Salah. He adds the American coach is trying to improve the agility and fitness of the Egyptian players to help them qualify for the World Cup in 2014.

DIAA SALAH: He's not the typical suit-and-tie coach. No, he gets his track suit on and he's down on the pitch with the players. He likes to get involved in all of the situations on the pitch. That gives a very good message to the players themselves.

NELSON: It's a message that Bradley relies on his Arabic-speaking assistants to translate for his players, most of whom don't speak English.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOUTING VOICES)

NELSON: But what the 53-year-old lacks in foreign language skills, his supporters say he makes up for by embracing the Egyptian culture and living among them in a popular Cairo neighborhood, rather than in a walled compound.

Again, youth coach Diaa Salah.

SALAH: He's not one of those coaches who likes to keep distance, no, he wants to be right in the middle of things - and I think Egyptians do like, are very warm and welcoming to coaches like that.

NELSON: Bradley says he's gratified by how Egyptians have welcomed him and his wife Lindsay since he took over the national team here last October.

BRADLEY: We recognize how proud Egyptians are of their country, of their history, of their culture and people have really reached out to us in a way that we feel very appreciative.

NELSON: How long the warm reception will last is unclear.

AHMED ADEL: (Foreign language spoken)

NELSON: In downtown Cairo, passerby Ahmed Adel expressed his frustration with the lackluster performance of the team in recent months. He and others here say Bradley has big shoes to fill, as his Egyptian predecessor, Hassan Shahata, led the Egyptians to three Africa Cup titles.

The American coach also faces major hurdles his predecessors haven't. Egypt's unprecedented popular uprising that forced Hosni Mubarak from power and the continuing struggle between his military allies and emerging democratic forces here, have weakened many of the country's institutions, including its soccer league. An even more devastating blow came last month with a fatal riot that killed 74 soccer fans following a game in the northern city of Port Said.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOCCER RIOT)

NELSON: It was the worst such tragedy in Egyptian history and led officials to cancel league games here for the rest of this year.

Bradley says it's also limited his opportunities to scout for new talent.

BRADLEY: There are probably 10 to 12 players that we would have considered for the camp that we have right now, had this incident not taken place.

NELSON: As of this month, the Egyptian team dropped to its lowest world ranking ever - 64th place - compared to ninth place two years ago. But Bradley says he's not giving up.

BRADLEY: I made it very clear that the national team will need to have camps and will need to find a way to play matches, especially when you consider that the league will not start up again.

NELSON: His players are training here and abroad, like in Qatar, where the Egyptian national team recently won five to zero in a friendly game against Kenya.

AHMED HASSAN: (Foreign language spoken)

NELSON: The 36-year-old Egyptian team captain is Ahmed Hassan.

HASSAN: (Foreign language spoken)

NELSON: He predicts that with their American coach's drive and the Egyptian players' confidence, the national team will recover.

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, NPR News, Cairo.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Remember, that you can find NPR News and many of our correspondence on Facebook, on Google Plus and on Twitter.

Andy Carvin has been one of the leading sources for news on the Arab Spring. You can find him on Twitter @acarvin. This program is @MorningEdition and @NPRinskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.