When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

The June 23 Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the troubled Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant — a huge, steam-belching facility that has long been the town's biggest employer.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

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The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

"Following one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in our history," the FBI's Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement, "the FBI redirected resources allocated to the D.B. Cooper case in order to focus on other investigative priorities."

This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

Alabama authorities say a home burglary suspect has died after police used a stun gun on the man.  Birmingham police say he resisted officers who found him in a house wrapped in what looked like material from the air conditioner duct work.  The Lewisburg Road homeowner called police Tuesday about glass breaking and someone yelling and growling in his basement.  Police reportedly entered the dwelling and used a stun gun several times on a white suspect before handcuffing him.  Investigators say the man was "extremely irritated" throughout and didn't obey verbal commands.

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A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

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After Sandy, Can The Jersey Shore Come Home Again?

Jan 3, 2013
Originally published on January 3, 2013 8:25 pm

Think about it and you'll start to realize how important the Jersey shore is to American culture. Sure there's the television show Jersey Shore, but there are more enduring signs. Consider the board game Monopoly; properties are named after Atlantic City locations. And during a television fundraiser for Superstorm Sandy victims in November, comedian Jimmy Fallon talked specifically about the Jersey Shore.

"As all you know, New Jersey was hit really hard. Some beaches were destroyed. Boardwalks were torn apart. But they will be rebuilt. It will come back," Fallon said as he and other musicians launched into the song "Under the Boardwalk."

The Jersey shore accounts for most of the estimated $39 billion tourists spent in the state in 2011. The shore is a part of the region's culture that inspires nostalgia. But there are questions about how to rebuild the places that are special to many and who should pay for it.

For millions of people, the Jersey shore also is part of their personal story.

"My parents tell me that I was conceived at the shore in Lavallette," says Lisa Petrino, a nurse from Yardley, Pa. "For a long time they called me 'Little Lava,' so I feel like it's in my blood."

Petrino says the shore has been a place where families like hers — that didn't have a lot of money — could vacation. For most, the shore is not a high-brow getaway. We're talking hot dogs, fudge shops, carnivals and roller coasters — not the kinds of things many people would fight to preserve, let alone rebuild. But Petrino hopes the shore she remembers will return.

"For so many people that roller coaster was a first date or a first holding hands or a first kiss. Could we get another roller coaster so that the future generations could still have that as a first experience?" she says.

As the Jersey shore rebuilds, it's becoming clear there are competing priorities that will have to be sorted out. In Long Branch, N.J., Maria Montanez has something else at the top of her priority list.

"I'm concerned about making sure you build smartly. Not so much rebuilding everything all over again, but rebuilding the area so, hopefully, it protects people for the future," Montanez says.

In principle, many with fond memories of the Jersey shore will agree with that statement. But this will change what the shore looks like. A roller coaster that prompts fond memories may be built again but perhaps not on a pier out over the water.

Never Again

In Sea Bright, N.J., dump trucks are still hauling away piles of what used to be homes and businesses. The cleanup here has a long way to go. Even the town hall was damaged, so for weeks after the storm, Mayor Dina Long says, various departments were housed together in a gymnasium.

"One hundred percent of the businesses were lost in Sea Bright during the storm. And 75 percent of our homes at this point are not habitable, including my own," she says.

Long says the city recovery plan — called Sea Bright 20/20 — is based on the principle of "never again," that the city will never be as vulnerable to a strong storm as it was before Sandy. That means a lot of changes.

"What I like to say is, we're putting Sea Bright up on high heels," Long says.

Long says a key element is elevating homes so they're above flood levels.

"Is it going to look like what people remember from their childhoods? The answer is no, it's not. It's going to look different. It's going to look taller. But the idea is the next time a superstorm rolls through, we want to be able to pull down the hurricane shutters and wait for the power to come back on," Long says.

That sounds simple, but dig a little deeper and you'll find there are some sticky issues that policymakers like Long will have to sort out. Here's just one: parking. As a tourist destination, the Jersey shore needs lots of parking spaces in the summer. But huge parking lots lead to runoff and water pollution.

That is a concern for Cindy Zipf, executive director of Clean Ocean Action. As the shore is rebuilt, she hopes that improving water quality will be a priority.

"Do we really need to put in a parking lot that has hard blacktop that all the water runs off? Or can we put pervious surface areas and make parking lots not as big and put more green spaces in them?" she says.

Business owners like Ernie Giglio have a different vision when it comes to parking. Giglio, who co-owns a tackle shop, says he'd like to see more places for customers to park "as long as they're going to redesign the area."

Sea Bright's mayor says she thinks she can balance these competing priorities. But that's just one issue. There are also questions about how beaches should be engineered. It's clear that building up dunes can protect property, but that also blocks ocean views for expensive beachfront homes.

A $2 Million Garbage Bill

Then there's the question of who will pay the billions of dollars it will cost to rebuild damaged communities. Mayor Long says her community of 1,500 people had about $400 million in damage.

"Our annual budget is $5 million. We have a $2 million garbage bill so far," she says. "This is bigger than we can handle on our own."

Some shore towns are debating whether to increase their beach access fees to raise more money for recovery but that won't be nearly enough. The federal government will have to help. Democratic Sen. Robert Menendez appealed to lawmakers for their support at a congressional hearing in late November.

"So I'm asking each of our colleagues in the Congress to stand with us and help New Jerseyans recover and rebuild in our time of need, just as I, personally, since I have been here, have stood with the people of the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina or the people of Joplin, Mo.," Menendez said.

The Democratically controlled Senate already has passed a relief package worth more than $60 billion. Under pressure from fellow Republicans — angry that a vote has not yet taken place — Speaker John Boehner says the House will vote on part of the package Friday and the rest of it later this month.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel. And we begin this hour in New Jersey. Tourism there is big business, and the Jersey shore accounted for most of the estimated $38 billion tourists spent in the state in 2011. In late October, Hurricane Sandy devastated long stretches of the shore. In some towns, entire business districts were wiped out.

As NPR's Jeff Brady reports, policymakers are now deciding how to rebuild those towns and who'll pay for it.

JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Think about it, and you'll start to realize how important the Jersey shore is to American culture. Sure, there's the television show "Jersey Shore," but there are more enduring signs. Consider the board game "Monopoly." Properties are named after Atlantic City locations. And during a television fundraiser for Sandy victims in November, comedian Jimmy Fallon talked specifically about the Jersey Shore.

(SOUNDBITE OF TELEVISED SANDY FUNDRAISER)

JIMMY FALLON: As all of you know, New Jersey was hit really hard. Some beaches were destroyed. Boardwalks were torn apart.

BRADY: Along with rock star Steven Tyler, Fallon sang this song to commemorate all the good times people have had at the shore.

(SOUNDBITE OF TELEVISED SANDY FUNDRAISER)

FALLON: (Singing) Under the boardwalk, down by the sea, yeah...

BRADY: For millions of people, the Jersey Shore also is part of their personal story. Lisa Petrino is a nurse from Yardley, Pennsylvania.

LISA PETRINO: My parents tell me that I was conceived at the shore, in Lavallette. For a long time, they called me Little Lava. So I feel like it's in my blood.

BRADY: Petrino says the shore's been a place where families like hers who didn't have a lot of money could vacation. For most, the shore is not a high-brow getaway. We're talking hot dogs, fudge shops, carnivals and roller coasters - not the kinds of things many people would fight to preserve, let alone rebuild. But Petrino hopes the shore she remembers will return.

PETRINO: For so many people, that roller coaster was a first date or a first holding hands or a first kiss. So, do we get another roller coaster, so that the future generations could still have that as a first experience?

BRADY: As the Jersey shore rebuilds, it's becoming clear there are competing priorities that will have to be sorted out. In Long Branch, New Jersey, Maria Montanez has something else at the top of her priority list.

MARIA MONTANEZ: I'm concerned about making sure you build smartly - not so much rebuilding everything all over again, but rebuilding the area so hopefully it protects people for the future.

BRADY: In principle, many with fond memories of the Jersey Shore will agree with that statement, but this will change what the shore looks like. A roller coaster that prompts fond memories may be built again, but perhaps not on a pier out over the water.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

BRADY: In Sea Bright, New Jersey, dump trucks are still hauling away piles of what used to be homes and businesses.

The cleanup here has a long way to go. Even the town hall was damaged, so for weeks after the storm, Mayor Dina Long says various departments were housed together in a gymnasium.

MAYOR DINA LONG: One hundred percent of the businesses were lost in Sea Bright during the storm, and 75 percent of our homes, at this point, are not habitable, including my own.

BRADY: Long says the city recovery plan, called Sea Bright 2020, is based on the principle of never again, that the city will never be as vulnerable to a strong storm as it was before Sandy. That means a lot of changes.

LONG: What I like to say is we're putting Sea Bright up on high heels.

BRADY: Long says a key element is elevating homes so they're above flood levels.

LONG: Is it going to look like people remember from their childhoods? The answer is no, it's not. It's going to look different. It's going to look taller. But the idea is the next time a superstorm rolls through, we want to be able to pull down the hurricane shutters and wait for the power to come back on.

BRADY: That sounds simple, but dig a little deeper, and you'll find that there are some sticky issues that policymakers - like Mayor Long - will have to sort out. Here's just one: parking. As a tourist destination, the Jersey Shore needs lots of parking spaces in the summer, but huge parking lots lead to runoff and water pollution. That is a concern for Cindy Zipf. She's executive director of Clean Ocean Action. As the shore is rebuilt, she hopes improving water quality will be a priority.

CINDY ZIPF: Do we really need to put in a parking lot that has hard blacktop that all the water runs off? Or can we put pervious surface areas and make parking lots not as big and put more green spaces in them?

BRADY: Business owners like Ernie Giglio have a different vision when it comes to parking. He co-owns a bait-and-tackle shop in Sea Bright.

ERNIE GIGLIO: A lot of the things I'd want them to do: try to get us more parking areas, as long as they're going to redesign - if they're going to redesign the area - pick out more available for customers to park.

BRADY: Sea Bright's mayor says she thinks she can balance these competing priorities. But that's just one issue. There are also questions about how beaches should be engineered. It's clear that building up dunes can protect property, but that also blocks ocean views for expensive beachfront homes.

And then there's the question of who will pay the billions of dollars it will cost to rebuild damaged communities.

(SOUNDBITE OF PHONE RINGING)

BRADY: Back at Sea Bright's makeshift city hall, Mayor Long says her community of 1,500 people suffered about $400 million in damage.

LONG: Our annual budget is $5 million. And so we have a $2 million garbage bill so far.

BRADY: You have a garbage bill that's nearly half of your annual budget.

LONG: Yes, that's correct. This is bigger than we can handle on our own.

BRADY: Some shore towns are debating whether to increase their beach access fees to raise more money for recovery, but that won't be nearly enough. The federal government will have to help. New Jersey Senator Robert Menendez had this appeal to lawmakers at a congressional hearing in late November.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

SENATOR ROBERT MENENDEZ: So I'm asking each of our colleagues in the Congress to stand with us and help New Jerseyans recover and rebuild in our time of need, just as I, personally - since I have been here - have stood with the people of the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina or the people of Joplin, Missouri.

BRADY: The Democratically controlled Senate already has passed a relief package worth more than $60 billion. Under pressure from fellow Republicans, angry that a vote has not yet taken place, House Speaker John Boehner says his body will vote on part of the package Friday and the rest of it later this month. Jeff Brady, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.