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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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5 Things You May Not Know About Rick Santorum

Dec 19, 2011
Originally published on December 19, 2011 5:24 pm

Born in the spring of 1958, former Sen. Rick Santorum — the son of a psychologist and a nurse — was the second of three children in a Catholic family. The Pennsylvania Republican spent most of his childhood in the Pittsburgh suburbs.

As a freshman at Pennsylvania State University, Santorum was bitten by the politics bug. He worked for the Senate campaign of Republican John Heinz, and he founded the campus chapter of College Republicans. Santorum graduated in 1980 and went on to get an MBA and a law degree. He and his wife, Karen, have seven children — all home-schooled.

In 1990, the 32-year-old Santorum was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, surprisingly sacking the Democratic incumbent. Four years later, Santorum pulled off the same feat and was elected to the U.S. Senate, again surprisingly sacking the Democratic incumbent. In 2000 he won re-election. But in 2006 he was sacked himself, in an 18-point defeat, by Democrat Bob Casey.

Since then he has practiced law and worked as a contributor to Fox News. He believes in a strong national defense and battling government corruption. He describes himself as a champion of faith and families, a defender of the taxpayer and a believer in American Exceptionalism.

Much has been written about Santorum, and much is known. But there might still be a few things you don't know about Santorum:

1. He jokes about growing up in public housing. Santorum's parents both worked for the Veterans Administration. "We always lived on the campus of the veterans hospitals. It was called the domiciliary," Santorum told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review when his father died in 2011. "I always joked that I spent my childhood in public housing."

2. He is a proud uncle. When Santorum was sworn in — as a newly elected member of the 102nd Congress — in January 1991, the New York Times reported, his young nieces Elizabeth Kusturiss and Alyssa Thornburg were at his side.

3. He stands up to his colleagues. In the early 1990s, the Senate wanted to give itself a $23,200 annual raise and needed the House to approve it. In an item titled "Profiles in Cowardice," the Wall Street Journal reported that because no one in the House wanted to be on record as supporting such a measure, it was proposed that the question be addressed by voice vote. One member, however, demanded that the vote be recorded, so that the electorate could know the responsible parties. That congressman was Rick Santorum. Of the 225 members present, only four seconded Santorum's motion. The measure fell short, the question was put to a voice vote, and the senators' pay was raised.

4. He has spoken out against community service for pay. In a debate with Santorum, incumbent Sen. Harris Wofford "spoke with feeling of his national service program that would pay students for civic involvement," according to a 1994 Washington Post story. Santorum retorted that Wofford "keeps referring to the '60s. ... These are old solutions and they don't work. Someone's going to pick up trash in a park and sing 'Kumbaya' around a campfire, and you're going to give them 90 percent of the benefits of the GI Bill! That's a slap in the face to every person who put their butts on the line in a foreign country. ... That's not what America is all about."

5. He is not universally beloved. Teresa Heinz, widow of John Heinz — for whom Santorum volunteered — and wife of Massachusetts Democratic Sen. John Kerry, once described Santorum as "short on public service and even shorter on accomplishments" and part of a "worrisome breed" of politicians who "mock, belittle and vilify those who disagree with them," according to The Washington Post in 1994. Over the years, Santorum has been criticized by a variety of others, including Teamsters president Jim Hoffa, who called him a "bum," and teen sensation Miley Cyrus, who will be voting in her first election in 2012.

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