Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The CEOs of AT&T and Time Warner were on Capitol Hill today defending their proposed $85 billion merger before a Senate antitrust panel. Republicans for the most part were sympathetic to the idea that the merger might benefit consumers - Democrats not so much. They were skeptical that the country needs another big media merger. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Republican Michael Lee of Utah opened...

President-elect Donald Trump rode to electoral victory in part on discontent with Washington. He promised to "drain the swamp" — referring to the nation's capital. And No. 2 on his "Contract With The American Voter," listing activities for his first 100 days, is a hiring freeze on all civilian federal jobs that aren't involved in public safety or public health. A freeze is not unprecedented. Other administrations — Democrat and Republican — have used them. Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and Bill...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: The rules that govern who gets paid overtime are about to change. On December 1, an additional 4 million workers become eligible to earn overtime, although it is not clear for how long. The incoming administration of Donald Trump has not said what it will do with the new regulations. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports on employees and employers in limbo. YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Human Resources Director Blair Boyer finally...

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up more than 1 percent Thursday at an all-time high of 18,807.88, as investors bet that the Donald Trump presidency will mean less regulation and more potential stimulus spending. Specific policies remain to be seen, but the president-elect pledged during the campaign to dismantle regulations, especially the Dodd-Frank financial law , which is now boosting financial stocks. Pharmaceutical stocks posted more gains Thursday, on the anticipation that the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: One of the day's many surprises was the way stock markets in the U.S. and Europe responded to the election news. The Dow Industrial's gained 256 points, about 1.4 percent. The conventional wisdom had been that a Trump victory would bring a big sell-off in the markets. NPR's Yuki Noguchi explains why that didn't happen. YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Andy Cross spent last night staring into various screens, tracking...

Come next Tuesday, millions of people will stand in line to vote; last presidential cycle, about 57.5 percent of eligible voters cast ballots. Still, that means nearly half did not. Many people stay away from the polls because they run out of time, or have a work conflict — in which case lacking paid time off to vote might be a factor. Paid leave to vote is covered by a patchwork of laws around the country. Twenty-three states require employers to offer some form of paid leave to vote. Others...

There aren't many things the two major presidential candidates agree on, but here's one: Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump say they would spend more to rebuild the country's aging infrastructure. Clinton proposes spending $275 billion over five years, and setting up a national infrastructure bank to leverage some of the funds to induce more private funding for additional projects. Trump is proposing tax credits to encourage private investment of up to $1 trillion over a decade. Their...

Sounds, particularly those made by other humans, rank as the No. 1 distraction in the workplace. According to workplace design expert Alan Hedge at Cornell, 74 percent of workers say they face "many" instances of disturbances and distractions from noise. "In general, if it's coming from another person, it's much more disturbing than when it's coming from a machine," he says, because, as social beings, humans are attuned to man-made sounds. He says overheard conversations, as well as high...

Elizabeth Allen was at a happy hour for a San Francisco tech firm a couple of years ago, when a co-worker started forcing himself on her and the few other women at the party — again and again. He was "giving us lots of hugs," Allen says, "trying to kiss me a few times; he grabbed my butt a couple of times." The women were outnumbered by men, some of whom looked on, bemused, as the women tried to signal their distress. Allen adds: "Probably the worst thing about that incident was that there...

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