Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renee Montagne and David Greene.

Known for probing questions to everyone from presidents to warlords to musicians, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous—like an American soldier who lost both feet in Afghanistan, or an Ethiopian woman's extraordinary journey to the United States.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, Cairo, Houston and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. In 2012 he traveled 2,700 miles across North Africa in the wake of the Arab Spring. In 2013 he reported from war-torn Syria, and on Iran's historic election. In 2014 he drove with colleagues 2,428 miles along the entire U.S.-Mexico border; the resulting radio series, "Borderland," won widespread attention, as did the acclaimed NPR online magazine of the same name.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the September 11, 2001, attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a forthcoming history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830's.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newhour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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5:55am

Fri July 24, 2015
U.S.

Mass Shootings In America By The Numbers

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 3:28 pm

Mass shootings as defined by the FBI happen about every two weeks in America. For nearly a decade, USA Today has been tracking these incidents on a website that paints a grim picture.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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6:24am

Thu July 23, 2015
Media

The Associated Press Puts Its Vast Archive On YouTube

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 9:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now here's your chance to be a witness to history or at least to see the video footage of people who were there.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

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6:12am

Wed July 22, 2015
Arts & Life

Novelist E.L Doctorow, Master Of Historical Fiction, Dies At 84

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 8:30 am

E.L. Doctorow, center, stands with other National Book Critics Circle award winners in March 2006 at a reception following the awards ceremony in New York. Doctorow's "The March" won the prize for fiction that year.
Tina Fineberg AP
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:39am

Tue July 21, 2015
Politics

Ohio Governor John Kasich Gets Ready To Join The Republican Race

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 8:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:24am

Thu April 30, 2015
History

Vietnam Veterans' Memorial Founder: Monument Almost Never Got Built

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 11:07 am

Jan Scruggs gazes up at the names of fellow military service members inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.
Steve Inskeep NPR

On a perfect spring morning, Jan Scruggs walks along the site overlooking the wall of the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial in Washington, D.C. Contrasting the bright colors of blooming trees and flowers is the black granite carved with the names of more than 58,000 Americans who served during the war.

Scruggs, a veteran himself, is credited with getting the memorial built. He's now preparing to retire. Morning Edition met Scruggs to learn the story of how the memorial was built, honoring the dead from a war that ended 40 years ago, on April 30, 1975.

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8:59am

Wed April 29, 2015
Around the Nation

Baltimore Is Not Ferguson. Here's What It Really Is

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 2:19 pm

A man makes a heart shape with his hands during a peaceful protest near the CVS pharmacy that was set on fire on Monday in Baltimore.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

This week's Baltimore riot could not have happened to a nicer city.

Baltimore residents welcome strangers and even call them "hon." They sit on benches painted with the slogan "The Greatest City in America."

Baltimore is also where people looted stores and burned cars Monday night. They did it when a man died a week after being arrested.

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5:30am

Tue April 14, 2015
It's All Politics

Republicans Are Making Foreign Policy The Obamacare Of The 2016 Election

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 1:35 pm

Senate Foreign Relations Committee member Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., questions Secretary of State John Kerry on Capitol Hill last month. In an interview with NPR, Rubio reiterated his opposition to President Obama's dealings with Iran and Cuba.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

In 2012, Republicans unanimously made a vow. If their party captured the White House, they would repeal President Obama's signature achievement, the Affordable Care Act.

In 2016, they've added something else: the reversal of Obama's signature foreign policy achievements, his outreach to hostile nations.

In his second term, Obama has been working to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba for the first time in more than half a century. His administration has also been negotiating a deal to limit Iran's nuclear program.

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5:01am

Mon April 13, 2015
Politics

Marco Rubio Expected To Announce Presidential Bid

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:37am

Tue April 7, 2015
The Two-Way

Obama Compares Iran Deal To A House Under Contract, Awaiting Appraisal

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 12:37 pm

NPR's Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep interviews President Obama at the White House on Monday.
Maggie Starbard NPR

I've rarely seen President Obama speak in such definite terms on a thorny issue as he did yesterday about the nuclear agreement with Iran.

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3:21am

Tue March 17, 2015
Parallels

A New Community Rises In The West Bank ... And It's Not Israeli

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 10:23 am

A Palestinian family leaves the visitors center at Rawabi.
Tanya Habjouqa for NPR

Palestinian investor Bashar Masri is building an entirely new city in the West Bank. It's a huge investment, with 5,000 new homes for tens of thousands of families. And, in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, it's also a political statement.

As we approached this new city of Rawabi, north of Ramallah, we saw a row of high-rise apartment buildings topped by construction cranes. Scaffolding surrounds the minaret of an incomplete mosque. Nobody has moved in yet.

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