Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

10:56am

Thu April 10, 2014
The Two-Way

New Ping In Search For Flight 370 Boosts Hopes Of Finding Jet

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:27 pm

A Republic of Korea P-3 Orion aircraft takes off from the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base Pearce during the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet near Perth late last month.
Jason Reed Reuters/Landov

An Australian plane detected yet another possible signal from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet in the southern Indian Ocean on Thursday, as searchers said they were feeling more confident that the aircraft's flight-data recorder ultimately would be found.

Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search off Australia's west coast, says an Australian air force P-3 Orion, which has been dropping sonar buoys in the search area, picked up a possible signal that may have come from a manmade source.

Read more

4:18pm

Wed April 9, 2014
The Two-Way

Wanted By The FBI: Bank Robber With Perfect Grammar And Spelling

A photo released by the FBI of the alleged bank robber caught on security video.
FBI

Apparently bank robbers aren't in the habit of worrying much about grammar and spelling when it comes to writing demand notes.

Not so for the "Good Grammar Bandit," who we might imagine turned to a life of crime because it proved more exciting (and lucrative) than being a copy editor.

Read more

1:54pm

Wed April 9, 2014
The Two-Way

In Turnaround, More Moms Are Staying Home, Study Says

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 3:10 pm

After decades on the decline, the number of "stay at home" moms in the U.S. has risen, with 29 percent of women with children under 18 saying they don't work outside the home, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

The figure from 2012 is up from 23 percent in 1999.

Read more

12:22pm

Wed April 9, 2014
The Two-Way

9-Month-Old Boy Charged With Attempted Murder In Pakistan

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:21 pm

A Pakistani lawyer takes the thumb impression from 9-month-old Musa Khan on a bail bond in Lahore, on April 3.
AFP/Getty Images

A 9-month-old Pakistani boy has been charged along with the rest of his family with attempted murder, according to reports.

Musa Khan was photographed last week crying as his grandfather held him for fingerprinting. He was with his family during a protest in a Lahore slum that turned violent in February. Police say the boy, who was 7 months old at the time, threw stones at them.

Read more

11:01am

Wed April 9, 2014
The Two-Way

On Heels Of GM, Toyota Recalls More Than 6 Million Vehicles

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 3:57 pm

Unsold 2007 RAV4 sport utility vehicles are shown on the lot of a Toyota agency in the east Denver suburb of Aurora, Colo., in 2006. The popular SUV was one of several subject to recall.
David Zalubowski AP

Toyota Motor Corp. is recalling more than 6 million vehicles spanning nearly 30 models in the U.S., Japan and Europe for a variety of problems, ranging from air bags not deploying to driver's seats not locking properly.

The top-selling RAV4 SUV, Corolla, Yaris and Matrix are among the vehicles being recalled, according to a company statement.

Read more

6:51pm

Tue April 8, 2014
The Two-Way

GM At Odds With Feds Over Recall-Related Documents

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 6:07 am

A Chevrolet logo on the grill of a 2013 Traverse at the 2013 Pittsburgh Auto Show. General Motors is recalling more than 1.5 million vehicles, including SUVs, vans and Cadillacs, for defective ignition switches and other problems.
Gene J. Puskar AP

General Motors says it has "fully cooperated" with federal authorities in connection with the recall of 2.6 million cars for defective ignition switches and other problems.

But the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration disagrees and says it will fine the automaker $7,000 for each day it misses a deadline to answer 107 questions that passed on April 4.

Read more

5:36pm

Tue April 8, 2014
The Two-Way

100-Year-Old Message In A Bottle Plucked From Baltic Sea

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 6:08 am

The bottle and note recovered from the Baltic Sea last week.
International Maritime Museum Hamburg

On a nature hike along Germany's Baltic Coast in 1913, 20-year-old Richard Platz scrawled a note on a postcard, shoved it into a brown beer bottle, corked it and tossed it into the sea.

Where it traveled, no one knows for sure, but it was pulled out of the Baltic Sea by a fisherman last month not far from where Platz first pitched it.

It's thought to be the world's oldest message in a bottle.

The French news agency Agence France-Presse writes:

Read more

4:38pm

Tue April 8, 2014
The Two-Way

Why Physicists Are In A Film Promoting An Earth-Centered Universe

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 10:13 am

Lawrence Krauss is among the scientists featured in the pseudoscience documentary. He says interviews of him were taken out of context for the film.
Monika Graff UPI/Landov

It has the look and feel of a fast-paced and riveting science documentary.

The trailer opens with actress Kate Mulgrew (who starred as Capt. Janeway in Star Trek: Voyager) intoning, "Everything we think we know about our universe is wrong." That's followed by heavyweight clips of physicists Michio Kaku and Lawrence Krauss.

Read more

12:29pm

Tue April 8, 2014
The Two-Way

NASA Image Shows Volcanic Island Has Annexed Its Neighbor

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 4:07 pm

An image taken by the Landsat 8 satellite last month shows the new, larger Nishino-shima.
Landsat 8 NASA

There's some new, pristine real estate on the remote Japanese island of Nishino-shima.

Volcanic activity has merged the tiny island with a new neighbor that started to form late last year, creating a single landmass, NASA satellite imagery shows. The island is now a bit more than a half-mile across.

According to NASA:

Read more

11:17am

Tue April 8, 2014
The Two-Way

Oscar Pistorius Sobs On Witness Stand At His Murder Trial

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 3:32 pm

Aimee Pistorius (second from right) cries as she hears her brother Oscar speak Tuesday during his murder trial in Pretoria, South Africa, about the night he killed Reeva Steenkamp.
Kim Ludbrook EPA/Landov

Oscar Pistorius sobbed and wailed from the witness stand in his murder trial in South Africa as he recalled what he maintains was the accidental fatal shooting of his girlfriend.

Pistorius, a double-amputee Olympic runner, was describing the moment he said he realized that he shot his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, through a bathroom door and not an intruder.

"That's the moment when everything changed," he told the court in Pretoria. "The first thing that ran through my mind was that I needed to arm myself and protect Reeva and I."

Read more

Pages