Ron Elving

Ron Elving is the NPR News' Senior Washington Editor directing coverage of the nation's capital and national politics and providing on-air political analysis for many NPR programs.

Elving can regularly be heard on Talk of the Nation providing analysis of the latest in politics. He is also heard on the "It's All Politics" weekly podcast along with NPR's Ken Rudin.

Under Elving's leadership, NPR has been awarded the industry's top honors for political coverage including the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a 2002 duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence in broadcast journalism, the Merriman Smith Award for White House reporting from the White House Correspondents Association and the Barone Award from the Radio and Television Correspondents Association. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Before joining NPR in 1999, Elving served as political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, Elving served as a reporter and state capital bureau chief for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. He was a media fellow at Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Over his career, Elving has written articles published by The Washington Post, the Brookings Institution, Columbia Journalism Review, Media Studies Journal, and the American Political Science Association. He was a contributor and editor for eight reference works published by Congressional Quarterly Books from 1990 to 2003. His book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster in 1995. Recently, Elving contributed the chapter, "Fall of the Favorite: Obama and the Media," to James Thurber's Obama in Office: The First Two Years.

Elving teaches public policy in the school of Public Administration at George Mason University and has also taught at Georgetown University, American University and Marquette University.

With an bachelor's degree from Stanford, Elving went on to earn master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California-Berkeley.

Pages

6:53am

Thu February 23, 2012
It's All Politics

Desert Face-Off May Have Closed Out Debate Season. So What Did We Learn?

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves to the crowd as he is introduced at the start of Wednesday night's Republican presidential debate in Mesa, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Ten months and a score of debates ago, the Republican Party and a slew of news organizations brought forth on our TV screens a new definition of a presidential nominating process — conceived in targeted marketing and dedicated to the proposition that no number of debates was too many for hardcore conservatives.

Read more

6:57am

Tue February 21, 2012
It's All Politics

Santorum's Problem With Women Could Be His Glass Ceiling

Originally published on Tue February 21, 2012 11:21 am

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks at the Kent County Lincoln Day Dinner on Monday in Grand Rapids, Mich.
Al Goldis AP

As February began, Rick Santorum's presidential bid was polling in the mid-teens among Republicans. Now, we find ourselves two weeks deep in the Santorum Era. His national polling number has doubled since he won the Trifecta Tuesday events in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri.

Those were small contests with few participants and zero delegates at stake. But Santorum threatens to win far larger and more meaningful tests in Michigan and Arizona a week from now, and in Ohio a week after that.

Read more

7:49am

Wed February 8, 2012
It's All Politics

Did Santorum Win Big or Win Squat? What's a Nation to Believe?

Republican presidential hopeful and former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum speaks to supporters, flanked by his daughter, Elizabeth (left), and wife, Karen.
Whitney Curtis Getty Images

Pity the poor news junkie, waiting bleary-eyed at the witching hour, wondering how to feel about the latest events in the Republican nominating contest.

One news source — let's say it's a cable news operation — says the latest round of GOP presidential preference contests is a huge boost to the flagging fortunes of Rick Santorum, the winner of the night's trifecta. The cable outlets all air tape of Santorum's triumphant victory speech again and again. He surely looks like a winner.

Read more

2:00am

Sun February 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Move Over, Iowa, Nevada Has A Caucus Problem Too

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 8:35 am

Jan White, left, Brenda Robertson, center, and Janet Freixas, right, count paper ballots at the headquarters of the Douglas County Republican Party Saturday in Minden, Nev., following county-wide Nevada caucus meetings.
Ted S. Warren AP

Imagine this: You're the Super Bowl host city, and you've gone to a lot of trouble to get the big game in your town. Now everyone's watching as the game comes to an end, and you can't get the scoreboard to work. Suddenly no one's sure who's ahead or how much time is left to play.

That nightmare scenario probably could not happen. But we have seen some highly improbable events lately that embarrassed the host states in the presidential nominating process.

Read more

7:08am

Mon January 30, 2012
It's All Politics

GOP Presidential Contest: Is It Over Or Just Getting Started?

Over the weekend, we heard Newt Gingrich assuring Floridians that his campaign was going all the way to the GOP's August convention.

Once the delegates got to Tampa, he said, all those who opposed former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney would unite to deny him the nomination.

"My job is to convert that [anti-Romney majority] into a pro-Gingrich majority," the former House speaker said Sunday.

Read more

7:06am

Fri January 27, 2012
It's All Politics

Live By Debate, Die By Debate: Gingrich Challenge To Romney Stalls Where It Began

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 10:10 am

On Thursday night in Jacksonville, Fla., Mitt Romney (right) went after Newt Gingrich from the start on topics such as immigration and colonizing the moon.
Matt Rourke AP

We still don't know who'll win the Florida primary Tuesday, but after the past two debates it seems far likelier to be Mitt Romney.

Why? Because Newt Gingrich had vaulted from the margins to the forefront of the Republican presidential race in South Carolina on the strength of two debate performances. And that weapon has ceased to work in his favor.

The NBC and CNN debates this week in Tampa and Jacksonville went a long way toward neutralizing the impression created by debates the previous week in Myrtle Beach and Charleston.

Read more

7:02am

Wed January 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama's And Daniels' Speeches Follow Classic Party Lines

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 8:48 am

President Obama delivers the State of the Union address at the Capitol on Tuesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

This year's State of the Union address may have set a record for fewest surprises.

The usual elements were all in place, starting with the sergeant at arms shouting across the din of the chamber, quieting the crowd of worthies from both House and Senate, the Cabinet and the Supreme Court.

Then the president made his way down the center aisle, shaking hands with the members who had sent staff members to reserve these favored seats for hours for just this moment.

Read more

1:34am

Tue January 24, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Redux: Did The Front-Runner Find A Way Back In?

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:35 am

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich debate at the University of South Florida in Tampa on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

On Tuesday, it is likely the presidential campaign's focus will shift to Mitt Romney's tax returns, which show him making $42.5 million in 2010 and 2011. That number may be bigger than he can finesse by saying in essence: Don't hate me because I'm successful.

Read more

12:49am

Sun January 22, 2012
It's All Politics

This Time, South Carolina GOP Bets Its Winning Streak On A Long Shot

Newt Gingrich along with his wife, Callista, addresses supporters at the Hilton Hotel in Columbia, S.C. following his primary victory. South Carolina voters have chosen the GOP nominee since 1980.
JEFF SINER MCT /Landov

By embracing Newt Gingrich in its primary, the South Carolina GOP has risked its remarkable record of success at picking the party's eventual nominee for president.

It's been quite a run. Beginning with its primary in 1980, when it chose Ronald Reagan, South Carolina has voted first among Southern states. And the Palmetto State's choice has gone on to dominate the other Southern states and lock up the nomination in short order. That happened eight times in a row, counting incumbent renominations.

Read more

6:16pm

Thu January 19, 2012
It's All Politics

Iowa Republicans To The GOP: Please Don't Ask Us Who Won

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 12:56 am

Iowa caucusgoers deposit their ballots on Jan. 3 at a school in Des Moines. On Thursday, the state GOP said it could not account for all votes from the caucuses.
Jewel Samad Getty Images

How embarrassing for Iowa GOP officials. How embarrassing for Iowa Republicans as a party. How embarrassing for Iowa.

But on the other hand, who told the world to hold its breath earlier this month, awaiting the latest word on who had edged ahead in the Iowa caucuses?

That would have been us. The news folks. Up all night to bring you the latest information — or misinformation, as it turns out.

And who told the world to care about these homey little midwinter Midwestern klatches in the first place?

That, too, would have been us.

Read more

Pages