Robert Krulwich

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, "Ratto Interesso" to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he has pioneered the use of new animation on ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight.

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News.

He won Emmy awards for a cultural history of the Barbie doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout online advertising and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Krulwich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Oberlin College and a law degree from Columbia University.

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7:38am

Sat October 5, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

A Zoo For You

zoo
YouTube

12:56pm

Fri October 4, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Comparing Sperm Whales To Sperm: A Swimming Contest

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 3:40 pm

Brad Purnell YouTube

11:41am

Fri September 20, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Doing A Da Vinci — If Only Leonardo Could See This

Leonardo da Vinci wikipaintings.org

11:14am

Wed September 18, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Mama Mia, Mama Mia! A Canadian Bohemian Rhapsodizes About String Theory

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 11:42 am

YouTube

9:45am

Tue September 17, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Always, Always There

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 2:26 pm

An Iraqi civilian walks through the vault of the National Museum in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 12, 2003. Looters opened the museum vault, went on a rampage breaking ancient artifacts stored there by museum authorities before the war started.
Jerome Delay AP

I'm going to tell two stories here, two very different stories. One's about bad guys hurting good guys that made me think the world is going to hell; the other is about good guys outfoxing bad guys and made me smile — made me think there's hope, always hope. I found them in different books.

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12:25pm

Fri September 13, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

A Most Delightful Map

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:07 pm

Courtesy of Massimo Pietrobon

Think about this: You wake up in New York City, decide to go for a stroll, head east after breakfast, and a short time later, still on foot, you find yourself in Morocco. Three hundred million years ago, you could have done that! There was no civilization back then, no cities, no countries, no people, but the land was there, so take a look at this map.

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1:48pm

Wed September 11, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

When The Dutch Keep Secrets, Everybody Notices. A Google Puzzle

Mishka Henner

What is this?

When I saw it for the first time, here's what I knew: It's a Google image found on Google Maps, taken by a satellite, plucked and blogged by photographer/sleuth, Mishka Henner. It's a patch of land near a town called Coevorden, in The Netherlands. There's a road on one side, plowed farmland all about, some trees on the lower left and then, weirdly, grey, black, white, golden, green and brown patches crunched together in an almost-rectangle. Those couldn't be natural, I thought.

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8:54am

Tue September 10, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

A New Kind Of 'More'

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:11 pm

The Glue Society

You've heard, maybe, about "Simple Living"? It's what some people do, Gandhi-style, to simplify their lives. They shed possessions. They watch their carbon footprint. They choose to live with less. They have what they need, and that's enough.

What's the opposite of Simple Living? (Everything needs an opposite, right? Read Hegel.) Well, if you want to conjure Simple Living in reverse, it's not gluttony. Anybody can buy too many shoes. No, the opposite of Simple Living should also be a movement with a name, a style — and lots of fans.

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12:03pm

Fri September 6, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

What We Can Never, Ever Know: Does Science Have Limits?

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:10 pm

iStockphoto.com

I got two books in the mail that, if they could have, would've poked, scratched and ripped each others' pages out. I don't know if Martin Gardner and Patricia Churchland ever met, but their books show that there are radically, even ferociously, different ways to think about science. Gardner died last year. He was a science writer whose monthly "Mathematical Games" column in Scientific American was wildly popular. Patricia Churchland is a philosopher who teaches at U.C. San Diego.

The issue between them is: How much can we know about the universe?

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8:33am

Thu September 5, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Wild Things Hanging From Spruce Trees

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 10:45 am

Robert Krulwich NPR

Stanley Kunitz, one of our great poets, planted a spruce tree next to his house in Provincetown, Mass., and over the years that tree attracted some tenants, a family of garden snakes. I didn't know garden snakes climb trees, especially needly ones like a spruce, but they do.

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