Robert Krulwich

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, "Ratto Interesso" to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he has pioneered the use of new animation on ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight.

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News.

He won Emmy awards for a cultural history of the Barbie doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout online advertising and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Krulwich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Oberlin College and a law degree from Columbia University.

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7:43am

Sat June 23, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Weekend Special: This Blog Now Has An Anthem

Getty Images

It's sung, of course, by Fred Rogers, or as we all call him, "Mister." He is our diva (divo?), and his theme is Wonder, like ours.

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8:58am

Fri June 22, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

How Do Plants Know Which Way Is Up And Which Way Is Down?

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 4:32 pm

Robert Krulwich NPR

Think of a seed buried in a pot. Like this one:

It's dark down there in the potting soil. There's no light, no sunshine. So how does it know which way is up and which way is down? It does know. Seeds routinely send shoots up toward the sky, and roots the other way. Darkness doesn't confuse them. Somehow, they get it right...

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11:08am

Mon April 2, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

To Map Or Not To Map The Brain? That's Tonight's Question

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:35 pm

Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman Portraits of the Mind

"Mind is such an odd predicament for matter to get into," says the poet Diane Ackerman. "If a mind is just a few pounds of blood, dream and electric, how does it manage to contemplate itself? Worry about its soul? Do time and motion studies? Admire the shy hooves of a goat? Know that it will die?

...How can a neuron feel compassion?"

Yes, how?

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1:14pm

Fri March 30, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Neuroscientists Battle Furiously Over Jennifer Aniston

Originally published on Fri March 30, 2012 3:54 pm

Stephen Lovekin, Carlos Alvarez, Kevin Winter Getty Images

Think of Jennifer, or as we like to call her, "Jen." Jen of the dazzling smile, Jen of the gorgeous chin, Jen with her hair down, Jen tousled, Jen as Rachel, Jen with Brad; Jen without Brad, Jen with Vince, Jen at the Oscars, and, of course, Jen as a neuron in the medial part of the temporal lobe.

Maybe you missed that last Jen.

A few years ago, a UCLA neurosurgeon named Itzhak Fried, while operating on patients who suffer from debilitating epileptic seizures, discovered what he now calls the "Jennifer Aniston Neuron."

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9:59am

Wed March 28, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

How To Spot A Mimic Octopus — The Mystery Revealed

Originally published on Wed March 28, 2012 12:02 pm

xkcd

In my last post, I wondered: How did Asian fishermen manage to discover the mimic octopus? Thaumoctopus mimicus is a wildly talented cephalopod that lives in shallow waters off Indonesia and Malaysia.

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10:10am

Wed February 29, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides for 80 Years

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 10:07 am

John White

No, this isn't a make-believe place. It's real.

They call it "Ball's Pyramid." It's what's left of an old volcano that emerged from the sea about 7 million years ago. A British naval officer named Ball was the first European to see it in 1788. It sits off Australia, in the South Pacific. It is extremely narrow, 1,844 feet high, and it sits alone.

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