Robert Krulwich

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, "Ratto Interesso" to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he has pioneered the use of new animation on ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight.

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News.

He won Emmy awards for a cultural history of the Barbie doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout online advertising and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Krulwich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Oberlin College and a law degree from Columbia University.

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12:04pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Not Winging It, But Ringing It

YouTube

Humans do it with smoke.

Dolphins do it with air.

With a little snort, dolphins can produce a nearly perfect "air" rings, (sophisticated non-dolphins called them toroidal vortices) which they turn into underwater toys.

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6:28am

Sat May 25, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

What If There's No Internet?

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 3:38 pm

Vimeo

I email. I search. I shop. I Facebook. I stream. I Skype. Every year I seem to do these things a little bit more. Stroke by stroke, as I slip deeper into the Internet's embrace, I find myself wondering:

"What would happen if the Internet went away?"

Can it? It was famously built to be indestructible, with no center, no hub, no "off" or "on" switch. It is, after all, a creature of the U.S. Defense Department, designed, supposedly, to survive a global war.

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8:45am

Fri May 24, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Who's The Best Drinker? Dogs? Cats? Or Pigeons?

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:56 am

Newspix/Rex/Rex USA

Take a look at this.

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12:03pm

Wed May 22, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

What Would Ben Franklin Do With A Bunch Of Balloons? Everything

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 5:40 pm

Robert Krulwich and Maggie Starbard NPR

Ask a great inventor to invent, and that's exactly what he'll do. Sometimes the ideas pop out like cannon bursts: "consider this ... " or "maybe this?" or "Wait! How about THIS!"

Ben Franklin did that with balloons.

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2:04pm

Mon May 20, 2013

5:48am

Sat May 18, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

David Foster Wallace Tells Us About Freedom

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 11:24 am

YouTube

9:56am

Fri May 17, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

What Did I Do Last Summer? Oh, I Discovered How To Make Babies Without Sex. And You?

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 11:26 am

Robert Krulwich NPR

Ah, if only all summers could be like June, July and August 1740 — when three young guys (and a 6-year-old and a 3-year-old) did a science experiment that startled the world. In those days, you could do biology without a fancy diploma. More people could play.

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9:51am

Tue May 14, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

What Is It About Bees And Hexagons?

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 1:26 pm

Robert Krulwich NPR

Solved! A bee-buzzing, honey-licking 2,000-year-old mystery that begins here, with this beehive. Look at the honeycomb in the photo and ask yourself: (I know you've been wondering this all your life, but have been too shy to ask out loud ... ) Why is every cell in this honeycomb a hexagon?

Bees, after all, could build honeycombs from rectangles or squares or triangles ...

But for some reason, bees choose hexagons. Always hexagons.

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6:02am

Sat May 11, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Astronomy's Little Secret: The Hidden Art Of 'Moonsweeping'

La Luna

A few nights ago, (Wednesday, I think, around midnight), I was by my window looking up, and there, hanging in the sky, I saw the moon. Not all of it, just what the almanac used to call "a crescent" — what my mom called a "toenail moon." The whole moon, I knew, was up there, hidden in shadow. The crescent part was facing the sun. That's the part you can see at the beginning of each month, my second grade teacher, Mrs. Elkins taught us, using a flashlight and a tennis ball to demonstrate the phases of the moon. Scotty Miller, I remember, got to hold the tennis ball. Mrs.

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8:03am

Fri May 10, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Music, Inside Out

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:40 am

Daniel Sierra Oscillate/Vimeo

What would it be like to be a string that made music? Not anything simple, like a guitar string or a cello string, but a magical string, a sine curve that's taut then loose, that doubles then doubles again, that sheds then dissolves into showers of notes — a flaming, sighing, looping, dissolving string. Curious?

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