NPR Staff

Pages

5:51am

Sun May 10, 2015
Music

At 70, Keith Jarrett Is Learning How To Bottle Inspiration

Originally published on Sun May 10, 2015 5:37 pm

Jazz pianist Keith Jarrett is celebrating his 70th birthday with two new releases: the classical exploration Barber/Bartók and the live compilation Creation.
Henry Leutwyler Courtesy of the artist

Keith Jarrett hit a milestone this past week: The famed jazz pianist turned 70 years old, and he's decided to mark the occasion with two new releases. One offers his take on two important classical works; the other, Creation, documents how his creative process plays out in front of a host of live audiences.

Read more

5:15pm

Sat May 9, 2015
Author Interviews

If Science Could 'Clone A Mammoth,' Could It Save An Elephant?

Originally published on Sat May 9, 2015 8:21 pm

A woolly mammoth skeleton gets auctioned off in Billingshurst, England.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

It's been more than 20 years since Jurassic Park came out, and scientists have been cloning animals almost as long.

So where are the baby velociraptors already?

In Russia, there is a park all ready for woolly mammoths and scientists there say it's just a matter of time before they can bring back actual mammoths to enjoy it. But why bring back a species that went extinct thousands of years ago?

Read more

8:03am

Sat May 9, 2015
Sports

A Cup's Adventures And Oddities On Ice: 140 Years Of Hockey Trivia

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 3:31 pm

An ice hockey match between the U.S.A. and Canada in February 1936, during the Winter Olympics at Garmisch-Partenkirchen.
Central Press Getty Images

The Stanley Cup Playoffs are well underway. Fans of the Winnipeg Jets are heartbroken; Chicago Blackhawk lovers are feeling great.

But you don't need to be an NHL superfan to find something fascinating about hockey. A.J. Jacobs, an editor-at-large for Esquire and a professional know-it-all, joined NPR's Scott Simon to talk about quirky facts from the sport's past and present.

How much hockey trivia do you know? Take a guess at which of the facts below are true, then hit "play" to see if you were right.

Read more

5:11am

Sat May 9, 2015
Author Interviews

For 'New Yorker' Cartoonist, '90 Percent Rejection Is Doing Great'

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 3:09 pm

Unlike the comic talent stereotype, cartoonist Matthew Diffee says he had "a wonderful family to grow up with."
Courtesy of Scribner

Matthew Diffee has been drawing cartoons for The New Yorker since 1999. When asked which comes first, the image or the words, he tells NPR's Scott Simon, "They both come at the same time. I start with words, but while I'm thinking words I'm picturing the drawing already."

Read more

8:10pm

Fri May 8, 2015
Animals

In 'Rise Of Animals,' Sir David Attenborough Tells Story Of Vertebrates

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 1:23 pm

Sir David Attenborough at the Beijing Museum of Natural History with fossil of Juramaia, as featured in the Smithsonian Channel series Rise of Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates.
Courtesy Smithsonian Channel

Famed British broadcaster and naturalist Sir David Attenborough has been lending his calming voice to nature documentaries ever since TV was in black and white.

Read more

4:32am

Wed May 6, 2015
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 2:09 pm

Jamaal Allan is a teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. His name has taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.
Courtesy of Jamaal Allan

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, in which thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

People make a lot of assumptions based on a name alone.

Jamaal Allan, a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa, should know. To the surprise of many who have only seen his name, Allan is white. And that's taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.

Read more

5:02am

Tue May 5, 2015
The 'Morning Edition' Book Club

Join The 'Morning Edition' Book Club As We Read 'A God In Ruins'

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 12:17 pm

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson is May's Morning Edition book club selection. We'll talk with Atkinson on June 16. Read along with us, and send us your questions and comments about the book. (Book guide by Veronica Erb/NPR)
Emily Jan NPR

Welcome to the second session of the Morning Edition book club! Here's how it works: A well-known writer will pick a book he or she loved. We'll all read it. Then, you'll send us your questions about the book. About a month later, we'll reconvene to talk about the book with the author and the writer who picked it.

Read more

2:03am

Tue May 5, 2015
Music Interviews

Willie Nelson: 'Ain't Many Of Us Left'

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 9:14 am

In his new memoir, It's A Long Story, Willie Nelson writes about his early career as a DJ in Fort Worth. He can still recite what he'd say on the air.
David McClister Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

The first thing you notice when you get on Willie Nelson's tour bus is a pungent aroma. Parked outside a gigantic casino and performance venue in Thackerville, Okla., Nelson offers NPR's David Greene a joint, which Greene declines. Nelson says he understands.

Read more

3:22am

Mon May 4, 2015
Photography

A Landscape Of Abundance Becomes A Landscape Of Scarcity

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 11:44 am

Courtesy of Matt Black

Photographer Matt Black grew up in California's Central Valley. He has dedicated his life to documenting the area's small towns and farmers.

Last year, he says he realized what had been a mild drought was now severe. It had simply stopped raining.

"It was kind of a daily surreal thing to walk outside," Black says.

Read more

5:26pm

Sun May 3, 2015
My Big Break

From Bond Girl To Medicine Woman: Jane Seymour's Big Break

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 8:13 am

Roger Moore and Jane Seymour in Live And Let Die.
Danjaq/Eon/UA/The Kobal Collection

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

You know actress Jane Seymour from the frontier town of Colorado Springs in the hit TV show Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.

Read more

Pages