NPR Staff

Pages

5:24pm

Sun January 25, 2015
My Big Break

How'd A Cartoonist Sell His First Drawing? It Only Took 610 Tries

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:43 am

After moving back home, Tom Toro didn't know what to do with his life. But a stack of magazines at a used book sale gave him an idea. "There they were," Toro says. "Cartoons in among the articles."
Courtesy of Tom Toro

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Tom Toro didn't always dream of becoming a cartoonist at The New Yorker. Sure, he drew cartoons in college, but he didn't see that as a career path. Instead, he went to film school at NYU.

Then he came to the sudden realization that he was in the wrong field — and he had no idea what he was going to do.

Read more

5:24pm

Sun January 25, 2015
Author Interviews

In 'Fatherland,' A Daughter Outlines Her Dad's Radicalization

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 12:12 pm

Courtesy of Liveright Publishing

How's this for a sweet post-World War II love story?

A man, far from his home country, places a personal ad in a newspaper back home for a pen pal. A pretty girl starts writing back. They fall in love. She moves overseas to be with him. They have three beautiful children and a charming house in Canada.

Then she finds out he's part of a Serbian nationalist terrorist organization preparing to bomb targets around North America.

Read more

8:00am

Sun January 25, 2015
Movie Interviews

At Its Core, Warped Family Drama 'Mommy' Is 'A Story Of Love'

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 9:59 am

Antoine-Olivier Pilon plays 15-year-old Steve in Xavier Dolan's Mommy.
Shayne Laverdière Roadside Attractions

French-Canadian filmmaker Xavier Dolan's new film, Mommy, won the Jury Prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival — an achievement for any director, let alone one who's just 25 years old.

The "mommy" in the movie is the fast-talking, hard-drinking widow Diane, or "Die" for short. She's trying to get back on her feet when her teenage son, Steve, is kicked out of yet another psychiatric institution. He moves back home, leaving both Die and the audience on edge, waiting for his next uncontrollable — and usually violent — emotional eruption.

Read more

6:29am

Sun January 25, 2015
Poetry

In 'Dear Father,' A Poet Disrupts The 'Cycle Of Pain'

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:56 am

Atria Books

6:14pm

Sat January 24, 2015
Research News

Study Says Creativity Can Flow From Political Correctness

As the U.S. workforce continues to become more diverse, researchers are now more than ever examining diversity and bias in the work place.
iStockphoto

There is a common belief that requiring the use of "politically correct" language in the workplace stifles creativity.

Michelle Duguid, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis, tells NPR's Arun Rath that, intuitively, that assumption makes sense.

"People should be able to freely think, throw any crazy ideas, and any constraint would actually dampen creativity," Duguid says.

Read more

5:04pm

Sat January 24, 2015
Author Interviews

Huckabee Serves Up 'God, Guns' And A Dose Of Controversy

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 10:41 pm

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee was a Republican presidential hopeful in the 2008 election. He writes that he wants his book God, Guns, Grits, and Gravy to introduce Americans to life in "flyover country."
Justin Sullivan AFP/Getty Images

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is currently considering jumping into the race for the Republican presidential nomination. But if you're looking for a clear sign of his intentions, you won't find it in his new book, God, Guns, Grits, and Gravy.

Read more

8:44am

Sat January 24, 2015
Author Interviews

Why A Black Man's Murder Often Goes Unpunished In Los Angeles

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:15 pm

In the State of the Union this week, President Obama noted that crime in America is down. "For the first time in 40 years," he said, "the crime rate and the incarceration rate have come down together."

Read more

7:59am

Sat January 24, 2015
Author Interviews

Two Outcasts Form An Artistic Bond In 'Mr. Mac And Me'

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 11:49 am

Esther Freud is the author of Hideous Kinky, The Sea House, and other novels.
Courtesy of Bloomsbury Publishing

Thomas Maggs is a lonely little boy. When Esther Freud's new novel Mr. Mac And Me opens, he is 13 years old. His brothers have died, his father, who runs a bar, drinks too much of his own stock and beats his son. Thomas dreams of sailing away – and then World War I descends on his small English sea coast town. Tours stop coming, blackout curtains go up, village boys enlist and go off to war.

Read more

4:36pm

Fri January 23, 2015
Author Interviews

When Pop Broke Up With Jazz

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 6:18 pm

Frank Sinatra captured by photographer William "PoPsie" Randolph during a 1943 concert. Author Ben Yagoda points to Sinatra as one of the interpreters who helped revive the Great American Songbook.
William "PoPsie" Randolph Courtesy of Riverhead

Writer Ben Yagoda has set out to explain a shift in American popular culture, one that happened in the early 1950s. Before then, songwriters like Irving Berlin, George and Ira Gershwin and Jerome Kern wrote popular songs that achieved a notable artistry, both in lyrics and music.

Read more

5:13pm

Thu January 22, 2015
Movie Interviews

'Red Army' Explores How The Cold War Played Out On Ice

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 10:14 am

The documentary Red Army profiles Viacheslav "Slava" Fetisov — one of the most decorated athletes in Soviet history.
Slava Fetisov Slava Fetisov/Sony Pictures Classics

When the U.S. Olympic hockey team upset the Soviet Union in 1980's "Miracle on Ice," President Jimmy Carter called coach Herb Brooks to congratulate him on the win.

"Tell the whole team that we're extremely proud of them," Carter said. "I think it just proves that our way of life is the proper way to continue on."

The other way of life, the Soviet way — which produced some of the best hockey players in the world — only went on for another decade or so.

Read more

Pages