Mark Jenkins

Mark Jenkins reviews movies for NPR.org, as well as for reeldc.com, which covers the Washington, D.C., film scene with an emphasis on art, foreign and repertory cinema.

Jenkins spent most of his career in the industry once known as newspapers, working as an editor, writer, art director, graphic artist and circulation director, among other things, for various papers that are now dead or close to it.

He covers popular and semi-popular music for The Washington Post, Blurt, Time Out New York, and the newsmagazine show Metro Connection, which airs on member station WAMU-FM.

Jenkins is co-author, with Mark Andersen, of Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital. At one time or another, he has written about music for Rolling Stone, Slate, and NPR's All Things Considered, among other outlets.

He has also written about architecture and urbanism for various publications, and is a writer and consulting editor for the Time Out travel guide to Washington. He lives in Washington.

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5:03pm

Thu May 7, 2015
Movie Reviews

'The D Train' Rumbles On With Another Hunk/Schlub Comedy

Henry Zebrowski (Craig), James Marsden (Oliver Lawless), and Jack Black (Dan Landsman) in Jarrad Paul and Andrew Mogel's The D Train.
Hilary Bronwyn Gayle IFC

"Inappropriate," today's foremost throat-clearing adjective, is the appropriate response to The D Train. This squirm-till-you-snicker comedy is about two immature males confronted with sexual possibilities they can't handle. One of the guys is 14; the other is his father.

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5:43pm

Thu April 30, 2015
Movie Reviews

In 'Marie's Story,' A Tale Of Teaching And Faith

Originally published on Fri May 1, 2015 4:47 pm

Ariana Rivoire and Isabelle Carré in Marie's Story.
Film Movement

Marie Heurtin was born blind and deaf just five years after Helen Keller, and she experienced a similar liberation through the discovery of sign language. The French girl's tale is the harsher one, since Keller didn't lose sight and sound until she was 19 months old and was able to communicate in a limited way with another girl before the breakthrough dramatized in The Miracle Worker.

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6:03pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Movie Reviews

'24 Days' Retells A Brutal Crime With Little Explanation

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 12:58 pm

Zabou Breitman plays Ruth Halimi in 24 Days.
Menemsha Films

24 Days recounts the grisly fate of Ilan Halimi, the young Jewish Parisian who in 2006 was kidnapped, held for ransom and tortured beyond what his body could endure. But it's not Ilan who addresses the camera at the beginning of the film. It's his mother, Ruth Halimi (Zabou Breitman).

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5:03pm

Thu April 16, 2015
Movie Reviews

'Monkey Kingdom' Is Best When It's All Monkeys All The Time

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:44 pm

Monkeys on Castle Rock from Disneynature's Monkey Kingdom.
Jeff Wilson Disney

As much fun as a tree full of toque macaques, Monkey Kingdom is arguably the most entertaining of Disneynature's eight features. But purists will recoil as soon as The Monkees theme enters, and there are times when the story told by narrator Tina Fey probably doesn't reflect the extraordinary images directors Mark Linfield and Alastair Fothergill captured.

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5:03pm

Thu April 9, 2015
Movie Reviews

Listening To The Ho-Hum Of The Machine

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 5:41 pm

Sonoya Mizuno and Alicia Vikander in Ex-Machina.
A24 Films

The latest British movie to play the imitation game, Ex Machina, is the directorial debut of novelist-screenwriter Alex Garland. This time, the stakes are higher than the Nazi conquest of Europe. The talky sci-fi puzzler turns on nothing less than the potential displacement of humans by artificially intelligent cyborgs.

Then again, maybe the film is just another riff on the battle of the sexes.

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5:03pm

Thu February 5, 2015
Movie Reviews

In 'The Voices,' The Dog And The Cat Talk, But The Film Says Little

Fiona (Gemma Arterton) and Jerry (Ryan Reynolds) in The Voices.
Lionsgate

A serial-killer spoof set in a parody of small-town U.S.A., The Voices wants desperately to be bizarre. But it manages just to be a little odd, and that's mostly because its vision of American gothic was crafted on a German soundstage by a Franco-Iranian director.

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10:16am

Fri January 2, 2015
Movie Reviews

Murder, Cows And Bad Funerals In The Absurd Comedy Of 'Li'l Quinquin'

Quinquin.
Kino Lorber

Although set in Bruno Dumont's home region of northern France, L'il Quinquin finds the writer-director in unexpected territory. The film is a arguably Dumont's first comedy, and was made as a four-part TV miniseries.

Yet with its relaxed pacing, inconclusive plot and elegant widescreen cinematography, the movie doesn't feel much like TV. And its humor is less a matter of overt gags than bemused attitude, which shows that the Dumont of Humanite and Hors Satan has barely relocated at all.

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1:25pm

Fri December 5, 2014
Movie Reviews

A 'Wild' Trek Made A Bit Too Neatly

Reese Witherspoon plays Cheryl Strayed in Wild.
Anne Marie Fox Fox Searchlight Pictures

With a backstory that includes heroin use and zipless you-know-whats, Wild is a daring foray for its star and producer, the usually prim Reese Witherspoon. As an excursion into the untamed stream of human consciousness, however, the movie is less bold.

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5:03pm

Thu November 13, 2014
Music Reviews

The Slow-Talking 'Foxcatcher' Goes Long And Comes Up Short

Originally published on Thu November 13, 2014 8:17 pm

Steve Carell plays John du Pont in Foxcatcher.
Scott Garfield Sony Pictures Classics

The rich are different from you and me. They talk more slowly.

Speaking ... like ... this isn't the entire extent of Steve Carell's impersonation of John du Pont in Foxcatcher, which fictionalizes an odd case from the 1990s. The actor is also outfitted with a prosthetic nose that recalls the beak of his cartoon alter ego, Despicable Me's Gru.

"Most of my friends will call me 'Eagle,' or 'Golden Eagle,' " John claims, but he looks more a sedated canary.

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6:29am

Sat November 8, 2014
Movie Reviews

In 'The Theory Of Everything,' Science Takes A Back Seat

Originally published on Mon November 10, 2014 8:48 am

Eddie Redmayne plays astrophysicist Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything.
Liam Daniel Focus Features

British science is having a cinematic moment, with The Theory of Everything now and The Imitation Game soon. Yet neither film has much science in it. These accounts of Stephen Hawking and Alan Turing, respectively, are engaging and well-crafted but modeled all too faithfully on old-school romantic dramas.

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