Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, and an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement.

Before her assignment to Jerusalem began in 2009, Garcia-Navarro served for more than a year as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief and before that three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. In 2002, she began a two-year reporting stint based in Iraq.

In addition to the Murrow award, Garcia-Navarro was honored with the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community." She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London. Lourdes is married to Times of London journalist James Hider. They have a daughter and they sometimes travel together for work and always for play.

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7:24pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Economy

As Brazil's Economy Goes In Reverse, Illusion Of Prosperity Fades With It

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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7:20am

Mon July 20, 2015
Sports

For The Rubik's Cube World Champ, 6 Seconds Is Plenty Of Time

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 4:14 pm

The Rubik's Cube world championships were held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, over the weekend, drawing participants from more than 40 countries. The winner completed his cube in 5.69 seconds.
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro NPR

Brazil hosted the World Cup last year. Next year, it will host the Summer Olympics. On Sunday, though, the country played host to another international gathering of talented competitors: the Rubik's Cube World Championship.

This past weekend, hundreds of "speedcubers," as they're known, descended on Sao Paulo from over 40 countries, to take part in three days of intensive competition.

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2:00pm

Fri July 17, 2015
The Two-Way

#NPRreads: Climate Scientists In The Crosshairs And China's Economy

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 3:52 pm

A man walks on Glacier Chacaltaya in the Andes mountains in Bolivia on Oct. 24, 2009. Glacier Chacaltaya was famous for being the world's highest ski run but since the mid-'90s has not had enough snow for skiing.
Juan Karita AP

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you four reads.

From Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, an NPR international correspondent who covers South America:

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5:39pm

Wed July 8, 2015
Latin America

Lead Prosecutor Brings Gandhi-Like Attitude To Brazil's Corruption Scandal

Originally published on Wed July 8, 2015 11:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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11:02am

Sun June 14, 2015
Parallels

Brazilians Take A Swing At Mosquitoes With The Zap Racket

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 3:03 pm

Pots with genetically modified male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured before they are released in Piracicaba, Brazil in April.
Paulo Whitaker Reuters /Landov

It's summer right now and I'm sure you've noticed them: small, insidious buzzing — mosquitoes. In Brazil, they are potentially deadly. It's the place where the mosquito-born virus dengue fever is most prevalent.

Enter the Zapping Racket. As the name implies, it is an electrified tennis racket that kills mosquitoes.

I know, right? Genius.

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5:06am

Fri June 5, 2015
Latin America

FIFA's Soccer 'Embassy' In Paraguay, Complete With Legal Immunity

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 6:14 pm

The headquarters of the South American Football Confederation, or CONMEBOL, in Luque, Paraguay. The confederation has the status of an embassy, which includes legal immunity in Paraguay. Two former heads of CONMEBOL have been indicted in the FIFA scandal, accused of taking bribes and money laundering.
Norberto Duarte AFP/Getty Images

Experiencing a five-star hotel can sometimes feel like you've been transported to another country. Take the CONMEBOL Bourbon Hotel in Asuncion, Paraguay.

Acoustic music plays while the sun sparkles on the rooftop pool. The view from the top looks down onto the manicured grounds of CONMEBOL, the headquarters of the South American Soccer Federation, where a helicopter pad has pride of place. You could almost ignore the unpaved roads nearby in this, one of South America's poorest countries.

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4:46pm

Fri May 29, 2015
Sports

Indictment Against FIFA Raises Questions About Nike's History In Brazil

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 6:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:06pm

Wed May 27, 2015
Sports

Soccer Fans In Latin America React To FIFA Corruption Charges

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 7:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

8:19am

Sun May 17, 2015
The Salt

Assault On Salt: Uruguay Bans Shakers In Restaurants And Schools

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 2:51 pm

A typical Uruguayan asado, or barbecue, is made up of vast racks of prime cuts of beef, pork or chicken roasted on a grill next to — not on top of — a wood burning fire.

At parilla restaurants across the capitol Montevideo, the asados are pretty epic; the fatty cuts sizzle and then get slapped onto your plate, oozing with juice.

But if you want to grab a salt shaker and add a bit of extra salt to your meal these days in the Uruguayan capital, you can't.

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9:00pm

Mon May 11, 2015
Parallels

Brazil's World Cup Legacy Includes $550M Stadium-Turned-Parking Lot

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 10:20 am

Brazil spent billions renovating and building World Cup stadiums. Almost a year after the tournament ended, the nation is still trying to figure out what to do with them. The Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia, Brazil (shown here in April 2014), was the most expensive of the stadiums — at a cost of $550 million — and is now being used as a bus parking lot.
Eraldo Peres AP

It has been almost a year since the World Cup in Brazil. The party is long over, but the country is still dealing with the hangover — in the form of "white elephant" stadiums and unfinished infrastructure projects. They come at a time when the country faces economic woes and the prospect of another expensive mega event: next year's summer Olympics.

The most expensive World Cup stadium — located in the capital, Brasilia, and with a price tag of $550 million — is being used as a parking lot for buses.

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