Julie McCarthy

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

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9:20am

Sun May 3, 2015
Asia

To Restore Its Shattered Treasures, Nepal Has A Secret Weapon

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 2:09 pm

Master carvers like Ratna Muni Brahmacharya are in a position to play a key role in restoring Nepal's many damaged temples and monuments.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Blue-uniformed police do the heavy lifting in Dubar square in the city of Patan, one of Nepal's oldest. Moving wooden beams and stacking broken bricks, they sift through ruined monuments, some of which date back four centuries and more.

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6:47pm

Thu April 30, 2015
Asia

He Carried His Mom On His Back For 5 Hours En Route To Medical Care

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 11:42 am

Amar Baramu carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours, then rode with her on a bus for 12 more, to get her to a hospital for the head wound she suffered during the earthquake.
Julie McCarthy NPR

He carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours.

Then he traveled with her by bus for 12 more.

She suffered a severe head injury when the earthquake rumbled through her village of Thumi. He was trying to get her to a hospital in the Gorkha district in northern-central Nepal.

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3:19pm

Thu April 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Indian Farmer's Apparent Suicide Sparks Political Backlash

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 4:05 pm

An Indian National Congress party worker on Thursday pays tribute to Gajendra Singh, a farmer who committed suicide during a candlelight vigil in New Delhi the previous day.
Rajay Gupta EPA/Landov

The apparent suicide of a farmer at a rally in central Delhi has turned into a political mud-slinging contest.

Gajendra Singh, reportedly in his 40s, was found hanging from a tree during a rally in New Delhi earlier this week. His death has quickly become a powerful symbol for disaffected and destitute farmers who oppose a government push to loosen restrictions on industrial acquisition of farmland.

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4:40pm

Thu March 26, 2015
Sports

Australia Defeats India To Advance To Cricket World Cup Final

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 8:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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12:14pm

Fri March 6, 2015
Asia

For India's Widows, A Riot Of Color, An Act Of Liberation

Originally published on Sat March 7, 2015 9:03 am

Susannah Ireland for NPR

"I have no one. I've lost everything. My children are gone, my parents are gone. My husband's family doesn't ask about me. They don't even look for me, they don't even know if I eat," says Manu Ghosh, 85.

That's her above, seen before and after the Hindu festival of Holi at her ashram in northern India.

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8:05am

Wed February 25, 2015
Asia

Young Indians Learn To Fight Pollution To Save Lives

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 2:19 pm

Smoke rises from chimneys of coal-based power plants in the Sonbhadra District of Uttar Pradesh, India.
The Washington Post/Getty Images

China's pollution is epic enough that even the mayor of Beijing said his city "is not livable" because of its noxious smog.

But a new study, published Saturday in the Economic & Political Weekly, shows that 660 million people — half the population — live in areas where fine particulate matter pollution is above levels considered safe under Indian standards.

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11:15am

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Head Of UN Climate Change Panel Resigns Amid Harassment Allegations

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:51 pm

Rajendra K. Pachauri speaks at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru, on Dec. 11, 2014. He is stepping down as chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
Juan Karita AP

The chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Rajendra K. Pachauri, stepped down Tuesday amid allegations of sexual misconduct that have engulfed the celebrated Indian economist and engineer.

Pachauri is one of the world's top climate change officials. His departure from the IPCC is a huge embarrassment for the group, which was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize along with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore for their role in galvanizing international action against climate change.

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1:39pm

Tue February 10, 2015
The Two-Way

India's Ruling Party Routed By Upstart In Delhi Elections

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 2:42 am

Aam Aadmi Party leader Arvind Kejriwal, center, waves to the crowd as his party secured a landslide victory in New Delhi, India, on Tuesday. The result is a huge blow for Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party.
Tsering Topgyal AP

Not even the most starry-eyed optimists of India's upstart Aam Aadmi [Common Man] Party dared predict they would pierce the armor of Prime Minister Narendra's Modi political invincibility as convincingly as they did today.

The party won a 95 percent landslide, capturing 67 out of 70 seats in the local assembly election in Delhi to decide who will govern the Indian capital.

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4:14pm

Fri February 6, 2015
The Two-Way

In India, Obama Speeches Spark Debate On Religious Tolerance

A policewoman detains one of the Indian Christians protesting against recent attacks on churches in the Indian capital outside the Sacred Heart Church in New Delhi, India, on Thursday.
Manish Swarup AP

The subject of religious intolerance is emerging as an irritant in U.S.-India relations.

Senior Indian government officials pounced on remarks by President Barack Obama at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington on Thursday. Referencing India, he evoked religious discrimination.

He said: "In past years, religious faiths of all types have, on occasion, been targeted by other peoples of faith, simply due to their heritage and their beliefs— acts that would have shocked Gandhi-ji," meaning Mahatma Gandhi.

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4:10pm

Tue January 27, 2015
Asia

Obama Makes Guest Appearance On Modi's Radio Show

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 6:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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