Gregory Warner

Gregory Warner is NPR's East Africa Correspondent. His reports cover the diverse issues and voices of a region that is experiencing unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. His coverage can be heard across NPR and NPR.org.

Before joining NPR, Warner was a senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, where he endeavored to make the economics of American health care vivid and engaging. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnoses on the doctor-patient relationship. He composed a Suessian cartoon to explain why health care job growth policies can increase the national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won the 2012 Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Prior to Marketplace, Warner was a freelance radio producer reporting from conflict zones around the world. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for NPR's Radiolab.

Warner's radio and multimedia work has won awards from Edward R Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, PRNDI, and a Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. He has twice won Best News Feature from the Third Coast International Audio Festival in 2009 and 2012.

Warner earned his degree in English at Yale University. He is conversant in Arabic.

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5:42pm

Wed May 13, 2015
Africa

Army General Overthrows President Of Burundi In Apparent Coup

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 6:56 pm

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10:22am

Tue May 5, 2015
Africa

Unannounced And Unprecedented: Kerry Makes A Stop In Somalia

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 11:18 am

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This next story will test the ability of the British to keep calm and carry on.

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London is the home of a new work of art. It is part of a competition.

INSKEEP: It's outdoors.

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4:31pm

Mon May 4, 2015
Africa

Kenya Pushes For Close Of Word's Largest Refugee Camp

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:02 am

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5:12pm

Thu April 16, 2015
Parallels

They Speak Hebrew And Keep Kosher: The Left-Behind Ethiopian Jews

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 8:27 pm

Jewish worshippers gather at a makeshift synagogue established by the Jewish Agency for Israel for Ethiopian Jews in Gondar, Ethiopia, in 2012.
Jenny Vaughan AFP/Getty Images

In the half darkness of an adobe hut in Gondar, Ethiopia, 20-year-old Gezahegn ("Gezi") Derebe pulls out an acoustic guitar. As on many evenings when the power goes out, he entertains his family by singing. Though his mother, Ayelesh, sways to the tune, she doesn't understand the lyrics, because Gezi sings not in his native Amharic, but in Hebrew.

Behind him, on a wall kept cool with a traditional mixture of cow dung and ash, hangs a laminated map of Israel. Above it are the framed photographs of his relatives who have already managed to emigrate there.

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10:48am

Mon April 13, 2015
Goats and Soda

After Global Protests, Kenyan Court Sentences 3 Men Who Raped Teen

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:53 pm

In March, demonstrators in Nairobi demanded tougher punishment for assailants of women and girls.
Anadolu Agency Getty Images

At 16, Liz was beaten and repeatedly raped, then thrown unconscious into a pit latrine in Busia County, in Western Kenya. The local police doled out their own brand of "punishment": They ordered the assailants to cut the grass at the police station.

But after millions of people around the world petitioned for a stronger punishment, a trial began last year. And on Monday, three of her assailants were sentenced to 15 years in prison.

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8:01am

Sat April 4, 2015
Africa

Kenya's Security Problem With Al-Shabab Doesn't Stop At Borders

Originally published on Sat April 4, 2015 2:38 pm

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9:50am

Thu April 2, 2015
Africa

Al-Shabab Militants Cross Border To Storm University In Kenya

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 10:08 am

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5:38pm

Mon March 30, 2015
Goats and Soda

Why Are Chinese Artists Representing Kenya At The Venice Biennale?

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:57 am

In The Shame In Venice 2, Kenyan artist Michael Soi protests the makeup of his country's pavilion at the Biennale.
Courtesy of Michael Soi

There's something sketchy at this year's Venice Biennale — the international art exhibition sometimes dubbed the Olympics of the contemporary art world.

When you come to the Kenyan pavilion, almost all of the artists will be ... Chinese.

The Biennale, one of the oldest and most important exhibitions of contemporary art in the world, takes place in Venice every two years. Thirty countries, including the U.S., have a permanent slot.

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3:50am

Thu March 26, 2015
Goats and Soda

Don't Torpedo The Dam, Full Speed Ahead For Ethiopia's Nile Project

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 10:06 am

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is under construction near Assosa, Ethiopia. When it's completed, the dam will have be able to produce 6,000 megawatts of electricity, making it the biggest hydroelectric power station in Africa.
Elias Asmare AP

I once met a popular spoken word poet in Ethiopia who was asked by a government official to write a poem about the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. (He politely explained that he didn't do poetry about infrastructure.) But it's not surprising that Ethiopia would like to inscribe this dam into the Ethiopian epic.

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4:19am

Wed March 25, 2015
The Salt

Vanilla, Nutmeg Spice And Everything Nice On A Zanzibar Farm

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 3:39 pm

Vanilla is seemingly a prima donna spice because its pods have to be hand-pollinated and then boiled and dried in the direct sun for only one hour.
iStockphoto

Let's start with a spice quiz. One is a bean discovered in Mexico. One's a tree native to India. One's the seed of a fruit discovered in Indonesia.

Today vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg can all be found in any spice farm in Zanzibar — the East African archipelago that was used as a spice plantation by the 18th century Omani Empire.

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