Gene Demby

Gene Demby is the lead blogger for NPR's Code Switch team.

Before coming to NPR, he served as the managing editor for Huffington Post's BlackVoices following its launch. He later covered politics.

Prior to that role he spent six years in various positions at The New York Times. While working for the Times in 2007, he started a blog about race, culture, politics and media called PostBourgie, which won the 2009 Black Weblog Award for Best News/Politics Site.

Demby is an avid runner, mainly because he wants to stay alive long enough to finally see the Sixers and Eagles win championships in their respective sports. You can follow him on Twitter at @GeeDee215.

There is popular wisdom out there that conversations about race are most productive when the people engaged in them are deeply, emotionally vested in the well-being of one another. Family might be a rejoinder to that wisdom. Perhaps there's such a thing as being too vested. On this week's episode of the Code Switch podcast, we heard from people who were expecting to go home to testy Thanksgiving dinners, with families divided over the results of the presidential election. We heard from Kate,...

Over the weekend, a sizable gaggle of the white nationalist "alt-right" convened at a federal building in Washington, D.C., to puff their chests. It was a motley crew, emboldened by the election of Donald Trump, with whom they shared a broad aversion to immigration and contempt for "political correctness." Their views were finally flitting around the mainstream of American politics. I guess that's why they were so touchy about their branding when my Code Switch teammate, Adrian Florido, asked...

As you probably have guessed, there has been a lot of conversation about race this week — So. Much. Conversation . — as folks, including us, try to wrap their brains around Donald Trump's election to the presidency. Here are some Code Switch recommendations for things you should hear and read. A Muslim and A Mexican Walk Into A Bar ... Comedian Negin Farsad, the creator of the documentary The Muslims Are Coming! , and journalist Gustavo Aurellano, the syndicated columnist behind the ¡Ask A...

It was Nov. 4, 2008. My birthday. Election Day. I made my way uptown to Harlem, where my friend Rakia was going to be watching the election returns with friends. I almost never wanted to go uptown — from Brooklyn, it may as well have been a trip to Guam — but that night I felt that I really, really needed to be in Harlem. There were about eight of us, all brown, posted up in Rakia's living room, eating pizza and tweeting and watching the news coverage. When CNN called the presidential race...

A few years ago, the Urban Institute undertook a massive experiment to measure discrimination in home rentals and sales. The researchers sent hundreds of people in dozens of cities across the country to act as applicants trying to rent or buy apartments and houses. The "testers" were given similar credit histories and financial qualifications. What the researchers they found was sobering: almost everywhere they tested, black folks, Latinos, and Asian Americans were shown significantly fewer...

So the family lore goes something like this: My mother was getting a checkup and some shots before a trip to Ghana with her boyfriend, who was from Accra. Then her doctor told her she was pregnant. Then more tests and more news: She was pregnant with twins . She would have to cancel her long-anticipated sojourn to the Motherland. I was in my early 20s the first time my mother told me any of this, just a few days before she finally got around to her trip to Ghana. I was in my feelings as she...

A few years ago, a pair of sociologists named Andrew Papachristos and Christopher Wildeman decided to study gun violence in Chicago. They focused on a specific community on the west side: overwhelmingly black and disproportionately poor, with a murder rate that was five times higher than the rest of the city. Their approach was to look at gun violence the way epidemiologists study disease — examining the way it spread by social connections. And like a virus, they found that there were certain...

"If the system was fair, would I be okay with prison? I'm saying that if the system was fair, there would be no prison." -- Morehouse College Professor Marc Lamont Hill When Marc Lamont Hill, a professor and activist who wants to abolish prisons, said that to me recently, I understood, where he was coming from. Intellectually, at least. America's criminal justice system, with its machine-like orientation to conviction and incarceration, has grown so many tentacles that it tends to touch the...

There was perhaps no movie more buzzed-about coming out of the Sundance Film Festival in January than Nate Parker's directorial debut, The Birth of A Nation , a retelling of Nat Turner's 19th century rebellion of enslaved people in Virginia . By the time the festival was over, Nation had netted an unheard-of $17.5 million distribution deal from Fox Searchlight Pictures. It was considered a frontrunner for a raft of major awards, and Parker, who had carved out a solid if largely below-the...

One of the most surprising stories of the Olympics, which end on Sunday, was the unseeded Monica Puig's improbable march to the gold medal in women's singles tennis . Puig's win captured Puerto Rico's first-ever gold medal in the Olympics, and set off massive celebrations across the island. It was a big-ass deal. Hold up , you might be thinking. Why does Puerto Rico have its own Olympic delegation? Aren't Puerto Ricans considered American citizens? The answers to those questions are layered...

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