Gary Ellenbolt

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Gary Ellenbolt brings South Dakotans the news of a new day on SDPB's Morning Edition.  Imagine the guy in the local coffee shop who knows everything, can't wait to tell everyone, and throws in a clever phrase now and again, and you'll have an idea of the typical morning on South Dakota's only statewide radio network.

Gary also works as a radio news producer, covering events of the state and stories that impact listeners.  During the fall and winter, he can be seen on SDPB Television's coverage of State High School Football and Basketball Championships.

When those aren't going on, he spends time as the radio play-by-play announcer for Briar Cliff University, an NAIA school in Sioux City, Iowa.  He fills in any calendar free space as a high school wrestling official.

Gary has also done some short fiction writing, with several stories published--including "The Question I Put Before God," "Aunt Alice and the War on Poverty," and "Eight Long Hours at Armbruster Salmon."

He holds a bachelor's degree in Radio-Television Broadcasting from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, and a Master's Degree in Contemporary Media and Journalism from the University of South Dakota.

Gary is married to Sandy, the Director of Human Subjects Protection at USD--they have two sons, Preston, a Lance Corporal in the United States Marines, and Tyler, a sixth grader.


Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Here's a sound you'd rather not hear out on a hike.

(SOUNDBITE OF A RATTLE)

BLOCK: That's a Prairie Rattlesnake from western South Dakota. Well, there's only one thing worse than a rattlesnake giving you that famous warning, one that gives you no warning at all. That's what's been happening with some rattlesnakes in South Dakota's Black Hills. They have apparently lost their ability to rattle.

As South Dakota Public Broadcasting's Gary Ellenbolt reports, that may be good for those snakes but bad for people.