Emily Sullivan

The death toll in what Somalis have described as their 9/11 has risen even higher.

On Oct. 20, the government said the toll had reached 358, making it Somalia's deadliest terrorist attack ever. The Zobe Rescue Committee, created by the Somali government in the wake of the attack, spoke with relatives of those at the denotation sites in efforts to establish a more accurate death toll.

Now, the committee reports that 512 people were killed, 312 were wounded, and that 62 remain missing, according to The Associated Press.

Craft breweries might be about to crack open a celebratory cold one.

Under the Senate tax bill, alcohol producers would save $4.2 billion from 2018 to 2019, according to Congress' Joint Committee on Taxation.

The measure would help small-brewery owners like Kevin Sharpe, the founder and president of Dark City Brewing Co. He hopes to use the extra money to expand his business in Asbury Park, N.J.

"More money means better beer, and hopefully more of it," he said.

Graduate students around the country walked out of their classes, office hours, and research labs to protest the House Republican tax plan Wednesday.

"This plan is going to be disastrous for higher ed," said Jack Nicoludis, a Harvard graduate student in chemistry, who helped organize a protest on the campus. He said the bill would more than double his taxes.

The most memorable part of this holiday shopping should be an amazing deal you found — not having to jump through endless hoops trying to reclaim your identity.

U.S. consumers are concerned about their personal information and identities during the holiday season, according to a survey by Discover. But these concerns won't affect how they shop, the survey showed.

Editing down your thoughts to cram them into a single tweet can be painful. Now, Twitter users might find that process half as painful.

In early September, Twitter announced it was moving on from its "arbitrary" 140-character limit by doubling the amount of characters a tweet can contain to 280.

Some users were instantly skeptical — after all, they had signed up for a website whose defining features were, as its founder and CEO Jack Dorsey noted, brevity and speed.

President Trump's speech at South Korea's National Assembly was meant to be a show of solidarity among the United States, South Korea and other Asian nations in the face of North Korea's nuclear ambitions.

Trump started by praising South Korea for its many achievements since the end of the Korean War in the 1950s, touching on technology, music, education and engineering.

Then, he arrived at golf.

Since the day he took office, President Trump's critics have been seeking more information about his company's lease to operate a hotel inside a taxpayer-owned building on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.

They have tried asking for records but have gotten nowhere.

About a year ago, Gustavo Douaihi and Laura Smith were looking to rent a house in Baton Rouge, La.

Douaihi, a geologist from Venezuela, and Smith, a high school English teacher who grew up in Alabama, had just gotten married. The couple was living in a tiny house overflowing with wedding presents when they noticed that a larger, nicer home in their neighborhood was available for rent.

"When we saw the 'For Rent' sign, I pushed Gustavo to call and look into it," Smith says.

Hysteria. Panic.

Those were words reporters were using on this day 30 years ago to describe the stock market crash, now remembered as Black Monday.

Oct. 19, 1987, brought the single biggest one-day percentage drop in history — and yes, that includes the 1929 crash that presaged the coming of the Great Depression.

On that frightening Monday three decades ago, the Dow Jones industrial average plunged 508 points — more than 22 percent — to just over 1,700.

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