Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

A federal jury in Minnesota has found three young men guilty of plotting to join ISIS and commit murder overseas, in a case in which six other men have already pleaded guilty. All of the men are Somali-Americans who are in their early 20s; they now face maximum sentences of life in prison.

From NPR's national security correspondent Dina Temple-Raston:

Affirming the status of a collective bargaining agreement, a federal judge sided with U.S. Soccer on Friday, ruling that players on the women's national team are prohibited from going on strike by their collective bargaining agreement.

The case is separate from a federal complaint by several high-profile players filed against U.S. Soccer in March, when they accused the federation of wage bias.

A U.S. pilot who was part of the Navy's Blue Angels demonstration team died Thursday after his F/A-18 aircraft crashed in Smyrna, Tenn., southeast of Nashville, according to military and local officials. The Blue Angels had been preparing to hold an air show this weekend.

The jet went down in an open field not far from an apartment complex, local officials said during a news conference Thursday afternoon. The crash occurred some 2 miles from the runway.

These details come from the Navy:

With his wife expecting a baby in October, American road racer Tejay van Garderen has withdrawn from consideration for the Rio Summer Olympics, citing the Zika virus that's been linked to birth defects.

From a statement released by USA Cycling on van Garderen's behalf today:

Bills that add gender identity to the protections for people using restrooms and other public accommodations have now been approved by both houses of the Massachusetts Legislature, in what's being hailed as a victory for LGBT rights activists.

The House approved its version of the bill Wednesday by a vote of 116-36; the Senate endorsed a similar bill last month, 33-4. The legislation will now go to a conference committee to resolve differences between the two versions.

Citing her company's problems, Forbes says it has sharply revised its estimate of the net worth of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes. One year after Holmes topped the magazine's list of the wealthiest self-made women with a worth of $4.5 billion, Forbes now values her fortune at "nothing."

Updated at 1:30 a.m. ET Thursday

Two bodies were found in a small office in an engineering building on the UCLA campus Wednesday. Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck said the incident was a murder-suicide.

Beck said a gun was recovered at the scene, adding, "There is evidence that there could be a suicide note."

A federal judge released hundreds of pages of court documents Tuesday related to Trump University, Donald Trump's real estate and investment training venture that has sparked lawsuits from former students. The records include a careful guide to selling — and to dealing with reporters.

The documents were released in response to a request from The Washington Post. After their release today, the newspaper's Tom Hamburger took a break from looking through the records to describe them to NPR's Ari Shapiro.

Discarding the results of a public poll that embraced "Boaty McBoatface" as the name for a $300 million research vessel, Britain's science minister has instead named the ship for famed naturalist Sir David Attenborough.

Boaty McBoatface received more than 124,000 votes in the online poll that was set up by Britain's Natural Environment Research Council — more than 10 times the 11,000 votes Attenborough's name received.

Days after they fled a powerful wildfire, more than 80,000 people who live in and around Fort McMurray are told that "it will not be a matter of days" before they can return home. Gusting winds have helped the fires spread farther, and more evacuation plans are being formed.

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