Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from five continents. (Sorry, Australia.)

As NPR's International Correspondent based in London, Shapiro travels the world covering a wide range of topics for NPR's national news programs. Starting in September, Shapiro will join Kelly McEvers, Audie Cornish and Robert Siegel as a weekday host of All Things Considered.

Shapiro joined NPR's international desk after four years as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. In 2012, Shapiro embedded with the presidential campaign of Republican Mitt Romney. He was NPR Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering one of the most tumultuous periods in the Department's history.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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6:34am

Wed July 29, 2015
Business

South Koreans Bristle At Growing Dominance Of Family-Run Conglomerates

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 1:57 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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3:42am

Thu July 23, 2015
The Salt

Buddhist Diet For A Clear Mind: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:01 pm

Iced tea made from local berries is served with melon and squares of sweet sticky rice topped with fruits and nuts. The nuns eat these sweets on head-shaving day, to replenish their energy.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jinkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul.

This Buddhist monastery sits at the convergence of two streams, amid twisting leafy trees and soaring peaks. It's one of many temples in the countryside outside of South Korea's capital. Each temple has its own specialty. Jinkwansa is famous for two reasons.

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5:33pm

Wed July 22, 2015
Arts & Life

The Story Of South Korea Told Through One Cartoonist

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 6:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:31pm

Thu July 9, 2015
Europe

Belgrade's Ruined Defense Ministry Serves As Reminder Of NATO Airstrikes

Originally published on Thu July 9, 2015 9:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:09am

Wed June 24, 2015
Parallels

Bulgaria Steps Up Efforts Against Drug Trafficking Across Its Borders

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:58 am

A Bulgarian border policeman stands near a barbed wire wall on the border with Turkey in July 2014. Experts believe that about two-thirds of the heroin that enters Europe comes through Bulgaria, and that a third of that moves on to the United States.
Dimitar Dilkoff AFP/Getty Images

As heroin addiction grows in the United States, the U.S. is focusing on the global supply chain, and officials believe one crucial link in it moves through Bulgaria, delivering most of the heroin that enters Europe — and some of what winds up on American streets.

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3:36pm

Mon June 22, 2015
Parallels

Russia And The West Play Tug Of War; Serbia Feels Caught In The Middle

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:32 pm

Serbian protesters hold a banner that reads: "Serbia-Russia, we don't need the European Commission" on March 21 in Belgrade. The marchers were from a Serbian nationalist organization opposed to the government, which has pursued closer ties with Western Europe.
Darko Vojinovic AP

Serbia stands at a crossroads these days, pulled in one direction by Russia, a longtime ally, and tugged in another by Western Europe, which holds the promise of economic opportunities despite its current financial troubles.

Given the friction between Russia and the West these days, it's increasingly difficult for a small country like Serbia to have it both ways.

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5:29pm

Sat June 20, 2015
World

Europe's Migrant Crisis Spreads Ashore As Refugees Enter Bulgaria On Foot

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 6:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:20pm

Fri June 12, 2015
Europe

In A One-Room Schoolhouse, Irish Family Keeps Legacy Of W.B. Yeats Alive

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 8:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:03am

Fri June 12, 2015
Parallels

In The Rolling Hills Of Galway, Spirit Of W.B. Yeats Lives On

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 7:30 am

Sister Mary de Lourdes Fahy transformed a one-room schoolhouse into the the Kiltartan Gregory Museum dedicated Yeats.
Rich Preston NPR

William Butler Yeats, one of the greatest poets of the 20th century, was born in Ireland 150 years ago this week, and across the country, the Irish are celebrating with public readings and festivals.

But his presence has never left rural County Galway, in far western Ireland, where Yeats spent many years, far from the big cities. And in turn, its landscape and spirit infuses so much of his poetry.

So it may not be surprising that a passionate nun in Galway has turned an old one-room schoolhouse on a country road into a small museum to Yeats.

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4:28am

Thu June 11, 2015
Parallels

Surrogate Parenting: A Worldwide Industry, Lacking Global Rules

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 8:58 am

Simon Clements, left, and Steve Williams with their 6-month-old daughter, Sophie, in London. The two British men began the process of finding a surrogate mother more than two years ago. While legal in the U.K., the practice of surrogacy is tightly restricted.
Ari Shapiro NPR

In the U.S., surrogate parenting is widely accepted. Although no official figures exist, experts believe perhaps a thousand American children are born every year through surrogacy.

A patchwork of state-to-state regulations governs the practice. But the bottom line is if you're an American in the market for a surrogate — and you have money to spend — you can do it.

Things are very different in other parts of the world.

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