Allison Aubrey

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

In 2009, Aubrey was awarded both the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for PBS' NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor's of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master's of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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4:26pm

Thu September 27, 2012
The Salt

Health Benefits Of Tea: Milking It Or Not

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 5:50 pm

The Emperor's Himalayan lavender tea is popular at Washington, D.C.'s Park Hyatt Tea Room, but please don't put milk in it.
Courtesy of Park Hyatt

The idea that milk may diminish the potential heart-health benefits of tea has been a topic of some debate. Lots of us can't imagine black tea without a little dairy to cut the bitterness. But, according to this research going back to 2007, we might want to at least consider trying, say, a nice cup of green tea sans sugar or cream.

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3:22am

Tue September 4, 2012
The Salt

Why Organic Food May Not Be Healthier For You

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:13 pm

A shopper surveys the produce at Pacifica Farmers Market in Pacifica, Calif., in 2011.
AP

Yes, organics is a $29 billion industry and still growing. Something is pulling us toward those organic veggies that are grown without synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.

But if you're thinking that organic produce will help you stay healthier, a new finding may come as a surprise. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds scant evidence of health benefits from organic foods.

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4:02am

Tue August 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

High School Daze: The Perils Of Sacrificing Sleep For Late-Night Studying

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 9:01 am

It may not be the best strategy to stay up late and cram. A new study finds that when teens don't get the sleep they need, all kinds of things can go poorly.
iStockphoto.com

High school students with heavy academic course loads often find the demands of homework colliding with the need for adequate sleep.

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5:29pm

Thu August 16, 2012
The Salt

Coffee Is The New Wine. Here's How You Taste It

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:03 am

Samantha Kerr prepares coffee at Artifact Coffee in Baltimore, MD.
Maggie Starbard NPR

The "know your farmer" concept may soon apply to the folks growing your coffee, too.

Increasingly, specialty roasters are working directly with coffee growers around the world to produce coffees as varied in taste as wines. And how are roasters teaching their clientele to appreciate the subtle characteristics of brews? By bringing an age-old tasting ritual once limited to coffee insiders to the coffee-sipping masses.

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8:52pm

Sun July 15, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Thriving Gut Bacteria Linked To Good Health

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 10:19 am

Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables is important for gut health, especially in aging adults.
iStockphoto.com

There's no magic elixir for healthy aging, but here's one more thing to add to the list: good gut health.

A study published in the latest issue of Nature finds diet may be key to promoting diverse communities of beneficial bacteria in the guts of older people.

To evaluate this, researchers analyzed the microbiota, or gut bacteria, of 178 older folks, mostly in their 70s and 80s.

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4:11pm

Fri June 29, 2012
The Salt

Afraid Of Pie Crust? You Shouldn't Be. It's As Easy As 3-2-1

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:54 am

To make a flaky pie crust, start by measuring out 12 oz. (by weight) flour, 8 oz. firm butter, 4 oz. ice water. Keeping it cool is key.
Phil Mansfield CIA

Yes, it's been meat all week. So are you ready for dessert? As a preview of Pie Week on Morning Edition and The Salt next week, we bring you this sneak peek of what we learned at the Culinary Institute of America.

Now, lots of people are afraid of making pie crust, but we've got a foolproof formula for you.

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5:48pm

Thu May 31, 2012
The Salt

Antibiotic-Free Meat Business Is Booming, Thanks To Chipotle

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 7:12 pm

The antibiotic-free pigs roam freely on Niman Ranch in Iowa.
Sarah Willis courtesy Niman Ranch

It's no longer just foodies at farm markets or Whole Foods buying antibiotic-free, pasture-raised meats.

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2:37am

Mon May 7, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Is It Possible To Walk And Work At The Same Time?

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 10:01 am

Studies say just 30 minutes of walking a day can reduce several lifestyle diseases many Americans are living with.
iStockphoto.com

When it comes to walking, the easy part is understanding the benefits: Regular, brisk walks can strengthen our bones, help control blood sugar, help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and the list goes on. The hard part is finding the time to fit it in.

Engineering physical activity back into Americans' daily lives is the goal of an educational campaign launched by Kaiser Permanente,an Oakland, Calif.-based health plan.

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4:00am

Mon April 2, 2012
The Salt

What's Inside The 26-Ingredient School Lunch Burger?

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:23 pm

Maggie Starbard NPR

Thiamine mononitrate, disodium inosinate, pyridoxine hydrochloride.

Why are these hard-to-pronounce ingredients added to everything from a burger served in schools to veggie burgers in the frozen food aisle of the grocery store? We try to answer that on this edition of Tiny Desk Kitchen.

It turns out the answers are as varied as the ingredients. But as we yearn to know what's in our food and how it's made, these kinds of ingredients with unfamiliar names make people suspicious.

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5:36pm

Mon March 26, 2012
The Salt

Does A Chocolate Habit Help Keep You Lean?

Originally published on Tue March 27, 2012 2:05 pm

Researchers say some compounds in cocoa may help us fend off fat.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

A new study finds that people who eat chocolate several times a week are actually leaner than people who don't eat chocolate regularly.

Really, we asked? Last time we checked chocolate was loaded with fat and sugar. But this new research, along with some prior studies, suggests chocolate may favorably influence metabolism.

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