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1:42pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Planet Money

The Failure Of The Candy Tax

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:13 pm

Last week, we re-aired an episode recorded in 2010 with economist Joshua Gans, author of the book Parentonomics. In the episode, Gans' 11-year old daughter, B., told us about his technique for keeping her from spending too much allowance money on candy:

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1:24pm

Wed July 11, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Absorbs Boos, Tells NAACP That Democrats Have Failed Blacks

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:02 pm

Mitt Romney speaks at the NAACP annual convention Wednesday in Houston.
Pat Sullivan AP

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney didn't expect a warm embrace when he took the stage Wednesday at the NAACP annual convention in Houston.

And he didn't get one.

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12:39pm

Wed July 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Kim Dotcom, Megaupload Founder, Offers To Extradite Himself

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 1:31 pm

Megaupload boss Kim Dotcom, left, leaves court after he was granted bail in the in Auckland, New Zealand.
Michael Bradley AFP/Getty Images

Kim Dotcom, the founder of Megaupload, now says he's ready to fly himself to the United States to face charges and forgo what could be a lengthy extradition process.

As you might expect, Dotcom made the offer of self-extradition on Twitter, saying:

"Hey DOJ, we will go to the US. No need for extradition. We want bail, funds unfrozen for lawyers & living expenses."

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12:37pm

Wed July 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Heir To Billions May Have Lived With Wife's Body For Days In Britain

Eva Rausing, right, and her husband Hans Kristian Rausing in 1996.
Alan Davidson AP

"Detectives are investigating whether one of the heirs to the Tetra Pak drinks carton fortune lived with his wife's body for up to a week after her death in their Belgravia mansion in London," The Guardian reports.

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12:23pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Book Reviews

'A Door In The Ocean' Leads To Dark Depths

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 2:23 pm

Many of the key scenes in David McGlynn's striking new memoir, A Door in the Ocean, take place at the beach or in swimming pools. McGlynn was a surfer and competitive swimmer in his school days and still squeezes into his Speedos for races like the annual 5K "Gatorman" off the coast of La Jolla, Calif. Ocean swimming, in particular, transports McGlynn to another realm, and he does a terrific job of dramatizing the allure of solitary swims in open water. Midway through his book, he writes:

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12:21pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Margaret:' Inside The 'Fall' Of A Teenager

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 1:32 pm

In Margaret, Lisa (Anna Paquin) distracts a bus driver, which leads to an accident in which a pedestrian is run over and dies.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Kenneth Lonergan's critically acclaimed film Margaret was completed in 2006, but because of several lawsuits, it wasn't released until last year.

Called "nothing short of a masterwork" by The New Yorker, the film stars Anna Paquin as Lisa, a Manhattan teenager who tries to make sense of a bus accident she may have caused — one that resulted in a woman's death. Lonergan tells Terry Gross that he wrote the film because he was interested in how teenagers transition into an adult world.

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11:55am

Wed July 11, 2012
The Salt

U.S. Pig And Cattle Producers Trying To Crush Egg Bill

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 8:54 am

Egg producers and the Humane Society agree on a bill to require larger chicken cages, but the pork and beef industries fear they're next and are fighting it.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Remember our reports a few months ago on the odd couple who struck an innovative compromise between egg producers and animal welfare activists? (Here's a hint: The deal calls for egg producers to replace their standard cages with new "enriched" accommodations, complete with perches and nest boxes where chickens can lay their eggs.)

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11:52am

Wed July 11, 2012
Economy

Did The Great Recession Bring Back The 1930s?

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:00 pm

Thousands of unemployed people wait outside the State Labor Bureau in New York City to register for federal relief jobs in 1933.
AP

The long economic downturn that began in late 2007 came to be known at the Great Recession –- the worst period since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Even though both events were momentous enough to earn the word "great" as a modifier, they really are not comparable, according to recent research by economist Mark Vaughan, a fellow at the Weidenbaum Center on the Economy at Washington University in St. Louis.

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11:46am

Wed July 11, 2012
Race

New Coalition Lifts Up Latino LGBT Familia

The civil rights effort Familia es Familia, or 'Family is Family,' had its coming out party at the National Council of La Raza convention in Las Vegas. It aims to increase acceptance of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender people in the Latino community, and more than 20 Latino rights organizations have signed on. Guest host Maria Hinojosa talks with Ingrid Duran, the co-founder of Familia es Familia, and Anthony Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

11:46am

Wed July 11, 2012
Beauty Shop

Is Outreach To Latina Voters Pandering?

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Maria Hinojosa. Michel Martin is away. Now, it's time for our visit to the Beauty Shop. That's where we get a fresh look at the week's news with a panel of women writers, journalists and commentators.

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