5:53am

Sun March 10, 2013
The Two-Way

In Ancient Aleppo, Plotting The Future

Syrians carry a large revolution flag and chant slogans during a protest in Aleppo, Syria, where young people and children sang songs against President Bashar Assad and the Syrian regime, Dec. 21, 2012.
Virginie Nguyen Hoang AP

A soft-spoken, clean-shaven, 31-year-old aid worker hopes to determine, in part, the future of Aleppo, Syria's largest city.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Author Interviews

Novel Explores 'Silence' And 'Roar' Of Life In A Place Like Syria

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

iStockphoto.com

The Silence and the Roar follows a young man living in an unnamed Middle Eastern country that is in chaos. The book doesn't explicitly take place in Syria, but the similarities between its setting and author Nihad Sirees' home country are undeniable.

Sirees' work has been banned from publication in Syria, where he's considered an opponent of the government — another point at which Sirees' story and that of his protagonist, Fathi Chin, intersect.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Author Interviews

Rita Moreno Reflects On Anita, Awards And Accents

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 1:55 pm

Rita Moreno won an Academy Award in 1962 for her role as Anita in West Side Story.
AP

You could hardly design a better Hollywood success story than that of powerhouse Rita Moreno: Born Rosa Dolores Alverio in Puerto Rico, she arrived in New York when she was 5 years old. Over the years, she became a talented dancer and ended up in Hollywood, making her mark in musicals like Singin' in the Rain and The King and I before winning an Oscar for her unforgettable turn as Anita in West Side Story.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Arts & Life

It's 'Literally' In The Dictionary

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to take a moment now to talk about a word - yep, one word. Maybe you use it all the time or maybe you feel people use the word and it drives you up the wall. I'm talking about the word literally.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Sports

The 'Pre-Gripe': How NCAA Seeds Its Tournaments

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is just one week until Selection Sunday. What is Selection Sunday you ask? Well, that is the day when the NCAA announces the teams that will compete in this year's men's basketball tournament. NPR's Mike Pesca wanted to give us a heads-up now before the griping begins about which teams made the cut and which didn't. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Consider this the pre-gripe gripe.

MARTIN: Yeah. I figured you might have some - I mean, you have a lot of issues - but you have specific issues with the NCAA selection process.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Afghanistan

Sniffing Out Bombs In Afghanistan: A Job That's Gone To The Dogs

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:42 pm

Military Police Sgt. Joshua Hancock and Nero, his Dutch shepherd, play at Forward Operating Base Frontenac in Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan. Nero is trained to sniff out improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, and to attack.
Sean Carberry NPR

Lucy is a stereotypically giddy black labradoodle. She's not what you picture when you think of a military dog serving on the front lines in Afghanistan. She wiggles around the room chasing her tennis ball and thinks my microphone cover is a chew toy.

But her handler, Spc. Heath Garcia, says when Lucy is on a mission, she's all business. She's highly trained to sniff out improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, which are the No. 1 killer of civilians and troops in Afghanistan.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
The Salt

Poi: Hawaii's Recipe For Revitalizing Island Culture

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 12:00 pm

Historians think poi, a sticky, nutritious food made from pounded taro root, has been eaten in the Hawaiian islands since the time of the ancient Polynesians.
iStockphoto.com

There are only about 1,000 people of pure Hawaiian descent left in the world, but island residents are cooking up an idea to keep native island culture from fading away. The key ingredient? Reviving a starchy food called poi.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
National Security

When Rand Paul Ended Filibuster, He Left Drones On National Stage

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 1:21 pm

Code Pink activists deliver flowers, candies and other objects of thanks to Sen. Rand Paul's Capitol Hill offices Thursday for filibustering John Brennan's CIA nomination.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky launched a nationwide conversation last week with his 13-hour filibuster of the president's nominee to lead the CIA.

Paul vowed to keep talking until the White House clarified whether it has authority to kill U.S. citizens on American soil with drones.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Music Interviews

Hiromi: Finding Music In The Daily Din

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

Hiromi's latest album is called Move.
Sakiko Nomura Courtesy of the artist

Japanese pianist Hiromi approached the making of her latest album with a love for all kinds of sound, no matter how quotidian.

"Even a car honk, I love it," Hiromi says. "Sometimes, when you are at the crossing point of the street, you hear different car honks at the same time and you hear amazing chords."

She says there's one particular sound from daily life that she could never warm up to, however, even though she depends on it to wake up: the chime of an alarm clock.

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5:39am

Sun March 10, 2013
Politics

Alaska Senator's Gun Proposal Looks To Fix Existing System

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 11:20 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with Sen. Mark Begich, an Alaska Democrat, about his newly proposed gun violence legislation. He introduced it at a press conference with Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham this past week.

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