5:03pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Movie Reviews

'My People,' My People: A French Farce Misfires

Forced to move back home with his family after a messy breakup, Reuben (Nicolas Maury) must come to terms with both his mother (Carmen Maura) and his French-Jewish roots.
Zeitgeist Films

If Tolstoy was right about every unhappy family being unhappy in its own way, the cinema of domestic dysfunction will likely never die. But it has gotten awfully droopy, mired in familiar plotting, quasi-wise psychobabble, or — in the case of so many comedies — a knowing prankishness (I'm looking at you, Judd Apatow) that wearies the soul.

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5:03pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Movie Reviews

Old-Fashioned Crime, Newfangled Camp In 'Baytown'

As leader of the murderous Oodie brothers, Brick (Clayne Crawford) takes care to target only the worst criminals in the Deep South.
Phase 4 Films

During The Baytown Outlaws prologue — a bloody massacre scene that doubles as a credit sequence — director Barry Battles interrupts the carnage with comic-book-style panels. It's a gambit he uses again later, and an appropriate one. This Deep South odyssey is a pulp fantasy and knows it.

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5:03pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Gangster Squad': Law? What Law?

Sgt. John O'Mara (Josh Brolin) and Sgt. Jerry Wooters (Ryan Gosling) aim above and beyond the law in the noir tribute Gangster Squad.
Wilson Webb Warner Bros. Studios

Decked out in impeccable suits and a fedora so crisply brimmed it could cut through drywall, Josh Brolin stars in Gangster Squad as a square-jawed policeman of the first order, an Eliot Ness type who would sooner burn a pile of dirty money than pocket a single dollar.

In 1949 Los Angeles, Brolin's Sgt. John O'Mara has been trusted with the task of rebuffing the threat posed by Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn), an East Coast gangster working quickly and ruthlessly to set up shop.

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5:01pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Author Interviews

In 'Sliver Of Sky,' Barry Lopez Confronts Childhood Sexual Abuse

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 9:03 pm

Barry Lopez
David Liittschwager Barry Lopez

Barry Lopez is known for writing about the natural world. His books include Arctic Dreams and Of Wolves and Men, where he explores the relationship between the physical landscape and human culture. But in a new essay in the January issue of Harper's Magazine, Lopez writes that he was sexually molested by a family friend when he was a boy, and says the man was never brought to justice.

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4:58pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Sports

Washington Redskins Fans Blame Coach For Quarterback's Injuries

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Audie Cornish talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about news in the National Football League. They cover the injury of Washington Redskins' quarterback Robert Griffin III, new information about brain damage sustained by the late linebacker Junior Seau, and a preview of the weekend's playoff games.

4:45pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Latin America

Hugo Chavez Misses Inauguration Day, But Supporters Fill The Streets

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez remained in Cuba, where he's receiving treatment for cancer, and was not present for his planned inauguration in Caracas on Thursday. However, thousands of supporters gathered outside the presidential palace to show their backing.
Leo Ramirez AFP/Getty Images

Three Latin American presidents turned up, as did foreign diplomats. And thousands of President Hugo Chavez's supporters flooded the streets Thursday outside the presidential palace in Venezuela's capital, Caracas.

But Chavez himself didn't show — he remained in Cuba, incapacitated after his latest round of cancer surgery.

Still, the carefully choreographed show did go on, and Chavez's aides said he remains in charge.

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4:39pm

Thu January 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Deadly Day In Pakistan: Dozens Killed In Multiple Blasts In Quetta

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 5:53 pm

Pakistani police officers and residents gather at the site of a bomb blast that targeted paramilitary soldiers in a commercial area in the city of Quetta, killing 11 people. Later in the day, twin blasts at a snooker club in the city killed at least 80 people.
Arshad Butt AP

Back-to-back bomb blasts in the Pakistani city of Quetta on Thursday have claimed the lives of at least 80 people.

"The death toll has risen to 81 so far," Mir Zubair Mehmood, a senior police official, said at a news conference. He said 121 people were wounded. His comments were reported by the privately owned Geo TV.

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4:39pm

Thu January 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Experience Trumps Hope In Obama's Second-Term Cabinet Selections

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 12:34 pm

President Obama nominates Jacob Lew to be his second-term Treasury secretary on Thursday at the White House.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

A re-elected president who gets to choose a second-term Cabinet has much more knowledge of the kind of team he needs than he did the first time around.

That's one simple way to understand President Obama's decisions as he creates his Cabinet 2.0.

The choices are not those of a president-elect who hasn't moved into the White House, or of a green president who hasn't watched his first international crisis unfold from his leather seat in the White House Situation Room.

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4:28pm

Thu January 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Estimated Costs Drive Debate As Florida Weighs Medicaid Expansion

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks in Fort Lauderdale in May.
J. Pat Carter AP

Florida and several other states are wrestling with a decision: whether to expand Medicaid.

When the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act last year, the court said states could opt out of that part of the law. But it's key. It would provide coverage to millions of low-income Americans who currently have no health insurance.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott says he's concerned about how much expanding Medicaid would cost. But others charge the governor is exaggerating.

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4:20pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

Speaking More Than One Language Could Prevent Alzheimer's

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 9:07 am

Scientists have found that bilingual seniors are better at skills that can fade with age than their monolingual peers.
iStockphoto.com

Not so long ago bilingualism was thought to be bad for your brain. But it looks more and more like speaking more than one language could help save you from Alzheimer's disease.

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