4:01pm

Wed January 23, 2013
The Salt

When Spilled Food Makes A Huge Mess (In A Tunnel Or On A Road)

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 9:42 am

Rarely do we consider the trucks, trains and tankers that transport our food around our cities — and around the world. It's not until an accident happens, and the food inside these vessels comes pouring out, that we remember all this food in motion around us, and how damaging it can be when it spills.

The truth is, a lot of food is extremely sticky, bulky — and sometimes, flammable. And apparently, the people who move it around are just as accident prone as the rest of us.

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3:35pm

Wed January 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Scientists Put An End To Moratorium On Bird Flu Research

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 8:53 pm

Health workers in Nepal culled chickens and destroyed eggs following an outbreak of bird flu in Kathmandu in October 2012.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Controversial experiments on bird flu could resume within weeks because leading influenza researchers around the world have finally called a halt to an unusual moratorium that has lasted more than a year.

The voluntary pause in the research started back in January 2012. Scientists had genetically altered the bird flu virus H5N1, changing it in ways that allowed it to spread through the coughs and sneezes of ferrets — the lab stand-in for people.

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3:06pm

Wed January 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Junior Seau's Family Files Wrongful Death Lawsuit Against NFL

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 6:40 pm

Junior Seau, seen here playing for the New England Patriots toward the end of his career, suffered from a degenerative brain disease, scientists say.
Otto Greule Jr. Getty Images

The family of former NFL linebacker Junior Seau has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the NFL, the Associated Press is reporting.

According to the wire service, Seau's family accuses the NFL of "acts or omissions" that "hid the dangers of repetitive blows to the head."

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2:13pm

Wed January 23, 2013
It's All Politics

Don't Expect States To Cooperate

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 3:01 pm

States are moving further apart on hot-button issues such as abortion and health care — and many may resist laws set in Washington.
Frankljunior iStockphoto.com

Blue states and red states are moving further apart.

That's one of the clear lessons from the annual "State of the States" report, which the Pew Center on the States is rolling out in a string of assessments this week.

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1:55pm

Wed January 23, 2013
Politics

Punting The Debt Ceiling Debate Down The Road

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 2:21 pm

NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin recaps the week in politics, from Obama's inaugural address to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's testimony on Benghazi. Jack Pitney, political science professor at Claremont McKenna College, discusses the Republican decisions on the debt ceiling and the future of the Republican party.

1:47pm

Wed January 23, 2013
The Two-Way

A Tennis Tale: Once Famous, 'Gorgeous Gussie' Dies In Obscurity

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 10:10 am

Gertrude Moran, "Gorgeous Gussie," playing at Wimbledon in 1949. Her attire, which included a bit of lace, shocked some.
George W. Hales Getty Images

1:42pm

Wed January 23, 2013
The Two-Way

London Police Arrest Two In 'Muslim Patrol' Incidents

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 5:58 pm

A screen grab taken from a video posted on YouTube.
YouTube

1:23pm

Wed January 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Some Hospices Turn Away Patients Without Caregivers At Home

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 7:56 am

Some hospices require patients to have a caregiver at home. But for many families, that's just not an option.
Guven Demir iStockphoto

Choosing hospice care is never an easy decision. It's an admission that the end is near, that there will be no cure.

But even after a family has opted for this end-of-life care, some still face an unexpected hurdle: Twelve percent of hospices nationwide refuse to accept patients who don't have a caregiver at home to look after them, according to a recent survey of nearly 600 hospice providers published in Health Affairs.

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12:38pm

Wed January 23, 2013
The Two-Way

House Passes GOP's Debt-Ceiling Plan; Senate Democrats Offer Their Support

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 2:01 pm

The House of Representatives (Jan. 3 file photo).
Kevin Lamarque Reuters /Landov

Update at 1:25 p.m. ET: By a vote of 285-144, the House just passed a Republican plan that postpones for three months the federal government's next bump up against the so-called debt ceiling.

As we said earlier, the measure would head off another big battle over raising the government's borrowing authority — such as the one in 2011 that almost led to a government shutdown.

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12:34pm

Wed January 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Union Membership Continues Decline; Now At Lowest Level Since 1930s

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says union membership continues to decline in the United States.

In 2012, American Union membership rate dropped to 11.3 percent from 11.8 percent in 2011. As The Washington Post reports, that's the lowest level since the 1930s.

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