3:08am

Wed February 20, 2013
Working Late: Older Americans On The Job

When A Bad Economy Means Working 'Forever'

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 8:34 pm

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The recession put a dent in Sims-Wood's savings, and she expects she'll have to stay in the workforce "forever."
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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3:06am

Wed February 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

Money Replaces Willpower In Programs Promoting Weight Loss

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 6:23 pm

Peggy Renzi (middle) talks with her teammates Erika Hersey (left) and Erica Webster. The three are part of a team of nurses in the Bowie Health Center emergency room in Bowie, Md., who are working together to lose weight.
Gabriella Demczuk NPR

Sticking to a diet is a challenge for many people, but starting next year, Americans may have an even bigger, financial incentive to keep their weight in check. The new health care law includes a provision that would allow employers with more than 50 employees to require overweight workers who do not exercise to pay more to cover their insurance costs.

Some employers, inspired in part by the success of shows like The Biggest Loser, are already designing weight-loss programs that use money to succeed where willpower has failed.

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3:04am

Wed February 20, 2013
All Tech Considered

In New York, Taxi Apps Raise Objections From Competitors

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 9:56 am

New York City rules will soon permit yellow cab drivers to accept rides through smartphone apps.
Richard Drew AP

Even people who've never been to New York can tell you how to hail one of the iconic yellow cabs there. You just raise an arm and flag one down.

But the city wants to change that. Following the lead of cities like San Francisco and Washington, D.C., New York wants to permit passengers to use smartphone apps to find a cab.

Since Mayor La Guardia established New York's modern taxi system in 1937, there have been two big innovations in cab hailing: the whistle and the red light bulb on top of apartment building awnings.

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3:03am

Wed February 20, 2013
Asia

Controversial Cleric Stirs Protests Upon Return To Pakistan

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 8:34 pm

Pakistani Muslim cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri (center), speaks to a crowd from a bulletproof box in Islamabad in January. The cleric recently returned to Pakistan after years in Canada, and his calls for an end to corruption have brought supporters to the streets in large numbers.
Farooq Naeem AFP/Getty Images

In Pakistan, a controversial Muslim cleric has been shaking up the political scene.

Dr. Tahir-ul-Qadri returned to his home country late last year, after spending eight years in Canada. Since coming back, he has ignited a disgruntled electorate and has left many people wondering what exactly his plans are.

On a recent day, a lively drum band wandered among a crowd of about 15,000 Pakistanis gathered in the eastern city of Faisalabad for a rally organized by Qadri.

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1:56am

Wed February 20, 2013
Kitchen Window

Be Prepared: Girl Scout Cookie Cooking May Surprise You

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 2:44 pm

Doreen McCallister/NPR

I'm not the first to develop recipes using Girl Scout cookies. About 20 years ago, I saw an article in a newspaper using Girl Scout cookies to make cakes. I made one of the recipes, and it came out almost as pretty as the paper's picture, and it tasted really good.

I was hooked. But before I could get started in the kitchen baking and cooking with Girl Scout cookies, I had a hurdle to get over. I had to decide whether I wanted to eat the cookies I ordered shortly after I received them — or delay gratification and experiment with them. It was a tough choice.

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10:03pm

Tue February 19, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Reminders Flood In: Athletes Are People, Not Heroes

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 4:08 pm

Oscar Pistorius, seen here winning a gold medal at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, faces charges that he murdered his girlfriend. Pistorius also competed in the 2012 Summer Olympics.
Ben Stansall AFP/Getty Images

These have certainly been dispiriting times for those who admire athletes, who proclaim that sports build character. The horrendous shooting by Oscar Pistorius is of course, in a category mercifully unapproached since the O.J. Simpson case, but the Whole Earth Catalog of recent examples of athletic character-building is certainly noteworthy.

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6:42pm

Tue February 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

How The Sequester Could Affect Health Care

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 6:56 pm

On Tuesday, President Obama urged congressional action to prevent automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin on March 1.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

It's looking increasingly likely that $85 billion of automatic federal budget cuts known as a sequester will come to pass if Congress doesn't act by March 1.

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5:57pm

Tue February 19, 2013
The Two-Way

Booker-Winning Author's Remarks About Kate Middleton Play Out In U.K. Media

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 3:05 pm

The Duchess of Cambridge receives a bouquet of flowers, as she leaves after a visit to Hope House in London on Tuesday. The former Kate Middleton appeared unaffected by the controversy surrounding remarks made by author Hilary Mantel.
Matt Dunham AP

Booker Prize-winning author Hilary Mantel is facing criticism over remarks about the former Kate Middleton in a recent speech.

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5:55pm

Tue February 19, 2013
WVAS Local

WVAS Local News

Attorney General Luther Strange has renewed his campaign to rid the state of all casinos.  State Troopers accompanied by staffers from the AG's office, conducted a raid at VictoryLand early Tuesday and seized hundreds of gambling machines and an undisclosed amount of cash. 

Gambling operators say the state is overstepping its bounds by trying to shut down four casinos in Alabama, claiming those are illegal.  The Poarch Band of Creek Indians says the state lacks the power to shut down its three electronic bingo operations in Atmore, Montgomery and Wetumpka. 

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5:47pm

Tue February 19, 2013
The Two-Way

After Snafu, Mississippi Ratifies Amendment Abolishing Slavery

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 7:24 pm

The actor Daniel Day-Lewis in the film Lincoln.
DreamWorks/Twentieth Century Fox

The movie Lincoln inspired a Mississippi citizen to push the state to correct a clerical error that kept the state from officially ratifying the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery.

NPR's Debbie Elliott sent this report to our Newscast unit:

"In 1865, Mississippi was among the states that rejected the 13th amendment. But in 1995 lawmakers voted to change that. Problem was the state never sent official word to the U.S. archivist, so the ratification was never recorded.

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