Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

4:38pm

Wed May 29, 2013
The Two-Way

Prosecutor: Radical Islam Motivated Attack On French Soldier

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 5:12 pm

A 2009 photo of the La Defense shopping mall, west of Paris, where Saturday's stabbing attack took place.
Jacques Brinon AP

Police in France say that a 21-year-old Muslim convert who confessed to stabbing a French soldier was apparently motivated by his religious beliefs, in an eerie echo of an attack last week in London, in which a British serviceman was killed.

Pvt. Cedric Cordiez, 25, was approached from the back and stabbed in the neck at a shopping mall in a suburb of Paris on Saturday. He was treated at a military hospital and released on Monday, officials said.

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4:34pm

Wed May 29, 2013
WVAS Local

WVAS Local News

In an ongoing effort to improve relations between police and the public, the entire force is undergoing a newly developed training course this week at the Montgomery Police Academy.  Police Chief Kevin is hopeful the emphasis on the way an officer approaches a crime scene or a victim will produce benefits now and later.  Dr. Earnest Blackshear, a clinical psychologist at Alabama State University helped develop the course and also teaches it.  The training is also part of the new Victim Service Officer program at the Montgomery Police Department. 

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4:30pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Books

How OxyContin's Pain Relief Built 'A World Of Hurt'

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 12:40 pm

iStockphoto.com

Prescription painkillers are among the most widely used drugs in America. In the decade since New York Times reporter Barry Meier began investigating their use and abuse, he says he has seen the number of people dying from overdoses quadruple — an increase Meier calls "staggering."

"The current statistic is that about 16,000 people a year die of overdoses involving prescription narcotics. ... It's a huge problem. The number of people dying from these drugs is second only to the number of people that die in car accidents," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Politics

Obama's OPM Nominee Did Latino Outreach For Campaign

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Democrats and Republicans both have a political interest in passing immigration reform as a way to appeal to the growing number of Latino voters. More than 70 percent of Latinos who voted last year backed President Obama. Well, now the president has tapped the political director of his campaign to lead the government's personnel office and if confirmed, Katherine Archuleta would be the first Latina to hold the title. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Politics

Tea Party Firebrand Bachmann Won't Seek Fifth Term

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:18 pm

Tea Party favorite and former presidential candidate Michele Bachmann announced that she would not run for re-election to her Minnesota House seat. Bachmann was facing a tough fight, having barely beaten an unknown Democrat in a district that Republican nominee Mitt Romney carried by 15 points.

4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Business

Online Currency Exchanges Hide Traces Of Money As It Moves

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

If Al Capone were alive today, this is how he would be hiding his money. Those words yesterday from the head of the criminal investigation division at the IRS. He was talking about Liberty Reserve, an online currency exchange now accused of operating a $6 billion money-laundering operation. It's believed to be the largest online money-laundering case in history.

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4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Business

Smithfield Deal Highlights China's Reliance On U.S. Farmers

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Smithfield Foods, one of the country's biggest meat producers is being sold to a Chinese company, the price $4.7 billion. If approved by regulators, this will be the biggest acquisition in history of a U.S. corporation by a Chinese company. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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4:10pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Media

Two Newspapers Battle It Out For The New Orleans Market

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 2:26 pm

Free introductory copies of the Baton Rouge Advocate's new New Orleans edition are seen next to copies of The Times-Picayune at Lakeside News in the New Orleans suburb of Metairie in September. The Baton Rouge newspaper started its own daily edition to try to fill the void left when The Times-Picayune scaled back its print edition to three days a week.
Gerald Herbert AP

Last year when New Orleans' main paper, The Times-Picayune, laid off dozens of newspaper employees and cut its circulation to three times a week, residents were shocked.

Sharron Morrow and her friends had bonded over the morning paper at a local coffee shop for the past 20 years.

"I've stopped my subscription, and I mourn the paper almost every day," she says.

Shifting Media Players

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3:52pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Parallels

In China, Customer Service And Efficiency Begin To Blossom

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 7:56 pm

A couple waits for a high-speed train in the Chinese city of Qinhuangdao. Modern infrastructure and the expanding private sector have greatly increased efficiency and customer service in many parts of Chinese life.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

China's infamous bureaucracy has bedeviled people for ages, but in recent years, daily life in some major Chinese cities has become far more efficient.

For instance, when I worked in Beijing in the 1990s, many reporters had drivers. It wasn't because they didn't drive, but because they needed someone to deal with China's crippling bureaucracy.

I had a man named Old Zhao, who would drive around for days to pay our office bills at various government utility offices. Zhao would sit in line for hours, often only to be abused by functionaries.

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