5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
National Security

Will Surveillance Disclosure Lead To More Oversight Of NSA?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The recent leaks revealing the extent of the National Security Agency surveillance programs came as news to many people. But some members of Congress have been warning for years that such surveillance could threaten the privacy of average Americans.

NPR's Larry Abramson reports that in the end, it was Congress that decided not to disclose details about these programs to the public.

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5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:08 am

Florida's housing market is picking up in places, but a home in Palm Beach just sold for more than 40 percent less than the asking price. The 20,000 square foot home was originally on the market for $74 million. According to The Wall Street Journal, it sold on Friday for a mere $42 million.

5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

Business News

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:01 am

On Monday, the company announced that CEO Christine Day will step down once a replacement is found. This comes after an embarrassing year for the company which makes fashionable yoga-wear. A recent recall of see-through plants could cost the company $40 million.

5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

Competitors Try To Chip Away At Pandora's Audience

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:56 am

On Monday, Apple announced iRadio — its entry into the crowded field of music streaming services. iTunes has become the top music retailer by selling song files. But no one in the music business thinks the iTunes model is the future. Pandora is the oldest and most successful streaming service so far. But it's been a disappointment to investors.

5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Around the Nation

Iowa Rebrands Medicaid Coverage

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Republican governor of Iowa is one of the longest serving in U.S. history. And with a election campaign coming up next year, he's suddenly taken a keen interest in making one controversial part of Obamacare work. That's the expansion of Medicaid, something some states are still deciding whether or not to do. Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters has more.

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5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

Data Leak Could Undermine Trust In Government Contractor

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 11:56 am

Federal contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, headquartered in McLean, Va., employed Edward Snowden, the computer technician at the center of the controversy over leaks involving the National Security Agency.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

In recent decades, a quiet revolution has been transforming the way Washington works.

Because the U.S. government does not have the workforce to complete all of its tasks, it employs private companies like Booz Allen Hamilton to do the work for it. Booz Allen is the company where Edward Snowden, who said he leaked secrets about the National Security Agency, most recently worked.

Over the past 25 years, this contract workforce has grown and plays a major role in the U.S. government, says Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.

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5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

Post Recession, Architects Return To The Drawing Board

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:39 am

While some jobs are coming back in this economy, the market for many architects remains tough. There were nearly 220,000 people working in the field in 2008. Today, more than 25 percent of those jobs are gone.

5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

National Envelop Hopes To Lick Bankruptcy Filing

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:38 am

National Envelope, the largest privately-held manufacturer of envelopes in the U.S., has filed for bankruptcy protection. It's a sign of the paperless, digital times. It previously filed for Chapter 11 protection in 2010.

5:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Law

Feds Buckle On Emergency Contraception Age Restrictions

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The morning after pill is moving from behind the counter to on the shelf. Last night, the Obama administration announced it will comply with a court order that allows girls and women of any age to buy the emergency contraception without a prescription and without showing ID.

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3:18am

Tue June 11, 2013
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:13 am

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops.
AP

As we head into the summer months, NPR is looking back to the summer of 1963, a momentous year in civil rights history. As part of NPR's partnership with The Race Card Project, which asks people to distill their thoughts on race to six words, Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris is asking people who were on the front lines of history to share their memories and their thoughts on race in America today.

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