11:31am

Sun March 17, 2013
The Two-Way

Two Steubenville Football Players Found Guilty Of Rape

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 12:37 pm

Two Ohio high school football players accused of raping a 16-year-old girl on an alcohol-fueled night last August have been found guilty and sentenced to jail.

On Sunday, the fifth day of trial in the Steubenville courtroom, Judge Thomas Lipps called the boys "delinquent" on all three counts against them – the juvenile court equivalent to a guilty verdict.

They were each charged with "digitally penetrating" the girl, which meets the state's definition of rape. One boy faced an additional count of distributing a nude photo of a minor.

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11:29am

Sun March 17, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The New Perfectionism: Why Can't We Just Be Ourselves?

iStockphoto.com

10:20am

Sun March 17, 2013
The Picture Show

Fake It 'Til You Make It: What Came Before Photoshop

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 7:48 pm

Leap into the Void, 1960 (Yves Klein, Harry Shunk and Jean Kender)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art

The term "Photoshopping" has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself.

An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.'s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography.

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6:31am

Sun March 17, 2013
You Must Read This

'The Quick And The Dead': Parables Of Doom And Merry Rapture

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 7:04 am

cover detail

Domenica Ruta is the author of With or Without You.

I worked as a bookstore cashier for six weeks, until the day my manager rebuked me for reading. The store was empty and I was standing behind the register when she ripped a paperback out of my hands.

"You look like you have nothing to do."

"I was reading," I said, the only sensible response to such a ludicrous indictment. I was actually hoping a customer would come in so I could hold forth on the very book she'd pried away from me.

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5:56am

Sun March 17, 2013
The Two-Way

The War Creeps Closer To Damascus

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:59 am

The scene of a car bomb explosion near the headquarters of Syria's ruling Baath party, in the center of Damascus, on Feb. 21. While the city is not involved in the fighting on a daily basis, the war is edging closer to the capital.
Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images

Editor's Note: The author is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus and is not being further identified for safety concerns.

In Damascus, you can smell the scent of gunpowder that wafts in from shelling on the outskirts of the capital. You hear fighter jets buzzing above. Ambulance sirens wail throughout the day, and death notices are regularly plastered on city walls.

Damascus is not under direct bombardment, like many other places in Syria that have been ravaged by an uprising now two years old. But the war is creeping closer, and residents feel the heat.

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5:55am

Sun March 17, 2013
The Salt

Yogurt For Men: A Review

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 12:44 pm

That's pronounced "Man, Go!"
NPR

Last week on Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me, we talked about a new yogurt for men, or brogurt, from a company called Powerful Yogurt. Here's what our panelist, comedian Jessi Klein, had to say about it:

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
National Security

Female Soldiers Face Tough Switch From Front Lines To Homefront

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 10:36 am

Sgt. Jaclyn O'Shea (second from left) and Sgt. Alyssa Corcoran (right) stand with Afghan commandos in Logar province, Afghanistan.
Courtesy of Jaclyn O'Shea

In a series of reports this week, NPR's Quil Lawrence looks at some of the most pressing challenges facing America's nearly 2 million female veterans. Like men, they often need assistance in finding jobs, dealing with PTSD and reintegrating into their families. And all too often, women say their military experience included sexual harassment or sexual assault.

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
Author Interviews

Reminder: Our Memories Are Less Reliable Than We Think

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

Cover of Pieces of Light

What's your first memory? You're a baby or a toddler. Maybe it's a specific experience, maybe an impression. Maybe someone's face, or just a kind of feeling or sense. Or maybe it's a compilation of stories over years. And maybe it's less true than you think it is.

In his new book, Pieces of Light, Charles Fernyhough digs deep into the recesses of memory to figure out what shapes it, how it works and why some things stick with us forever. Fernyhough talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his own first memory and his exploration of the science of remembering.

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
Author Interviews

Tsunami Delivers A Young Diarist's 'Tale' Of Bullying And Depression

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:32 am

A Tale for the Time Being presents the diary of a friendly, funny and strong-willed 16-year-old girl named Nao. Nao spent her formative years in California, but her family has returned to Japan, and when the book begins, she's living in Tokyo.

Nao tells readers right up front that her diary will be a log of her last few days on Earth: She plans to take her own life, and as the story goes on, readers learn why.

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5:52am

Sun March 17, 2013
Around the Nation

Erin Go Bragh, Shalom: St. Patrick's Day The Jewish Way

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 11:33 pm

St. Patrick's Day in New York now means parades and green beer. But 50 years ago, it also meant green matzo balls at the annual banquet of the Loyal League of Yiddish Sons of Erin. The league was a fraternal organization of Irish-born Jews.

The major migration of Jews to Ireland started in the 1880s and '90s, says Hasia Diner, who teaches history and Judaic studies at New York University. Thousands moved, primarily from Lithuania.

Diner says the first generation of Irish Jews mostly worked as peddlers. But by the 20th century, peddlers became business owners.

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