3:23am

Mon April 1, 2013
Business

EPA's Push For More Ethanol Could Be Too Little, Too Late

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

A decal advertising E85 ethanol is displayed on a pump at a gas station in Johnston, Iowa.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency could soon issue a final ruling that aims to force oil companies to replace E10, gasoline mixed with 10 percent ethanol, with E15.

This move could come just as widespread support for ethanol, which is made from corn, appears to be eroding.

Mike Mitchell was once a true believer in ethanol as a homegrown solution to foreign oil imports. He owns gas stations, and he went further than most, installing expensive blender pumps that let customers choose E15, E20 and all the way up to E85.

Read more

3:21am

Mon April 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

As Stroke Risk Rises Among Younger Adults, So Does Early Death

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

When Melissa McCann (left) suffered a stroke in 2007, her twin sister, Terry Blanchard, helped her make a full recovery. McCann is now back to work as a flight nurse with Life Flight at the Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor.
David Wright/Redux Pictures for NPR

Most people (including a lot of doctors) think of a stroke as something that happens to old people. But the rate is increasing among those in their 50s, 40s and even younger.

In one recent 10-year period, the rate of strokes in Americans younger than 55 went up 84 percent among whites and 54 percent among blacks. One in 5 strokes now occurs in adults 20 to 55 years old — up from 1 in 8 in the mid-1990s.

Read more

3:20am

Mon April 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

Study Hints Vitamin D Might Help Curb High Blood Pressure

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Reducing dietary salt and alcohol, exercising, not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight are other lifestyle tweaks known to help prevent or reduce high blood pressure, doctors say.
David McNew Getty Images

We've heard many claims in the past decade — and much debate — about the role of vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of conditions as varied as brittle bones, heart disease, cancer, diabetes and dementia.

Read more

3:19am

Mon April 1, 2013
Arts & Life

'A Lovely Feeling': Celebrating Older Women With Fabulous Style

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Ilona Royce Smithkin, 93, cut her red hair to make her eyelashes.
Courtesy of Ari Seth Cohen

3:16am

Mon April 1, 2013
The Salt

Journey To Java's 'Tempeh Village': Where Soybean Cakes Are Born

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Preparing the soy beans to be fermented
Anthony?

For centuries, Asia has been home to sophisticated vegetarian cultures. In recent years, Americans have gradually discovered cooking with meat substitutes like tofu and an Indonesia soybean cake called tempeh.

Tempeh is known for being versatile. There's an almost endless variety of ways to cook it. My favorite is perhaps one of the simplest: Cut it into thin slices, cover it in spices and crushed coriander seeds, and pan-fry it in a little oil until it's golden brown.

Read more

3:16am

Mon April 1, 2013
Research News

Why Not Apologizing Makes You Feel Better

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Illustration by NPR

To err is human.

So is refusing to apologize for those errors.

From toddlers and talk show hosts to preteens and presidents, we all know people who have done stupid, silly and evil things, then squared their jaws and told the world they've done nothing wrong.

Read more

3:15am

Mon April 1, 2013
Asia

Pakistan's Ambitious Program To Re-Educate Militants

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Pakistani men who worked for the Taliban attend a class at Mishal, an army-run rehabilitation center in Pakistan's Swat Valley, on July 5, 2011. This and similar centers are trying to re-educate men taken in by the Taliban, who ruled Swat before the military drove out the insurgents in 2009.
Farooq Naeem AFP/Getty Images

A Pakistani army officer named Col. Zeshan is giving a tour of a jihadi rehabilitation center secreted in the hills of northwest Pakistan's Swat Valley.

"This place was also captured by the Taliban," he says, walking me around the heavily guarded complex. "The army took over this place from them ... when the war was going on."

Read more

5:22pm

Sun March 31, 2013
Performing Arts

For Female Magicians, The First Trick Is Being Accepted

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 6:28 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks to female magician, Dorothy Dietrich, on the struggles of being a female in a male dominated magic world.

5:22pm

Sun March 31, 2013
Science

Somewhere Over The Brainbow: The Journey To Map the Human Brain

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 9:55 pm

More than 100 years ago, Golgi staining on nerve cells opened the gates to modern neuroscience. Scientists recently developed the Technicolor version of Golgi staining, Brainbow, allowing more detailed reconstructions of brain circuits.
AFP/Getty Images

During the State of the Union, President Obama said the nation is about to embark on an ambitious project: to examine the human brain and create a road map to the trillions of connections that make it work.

"Every dollar we invested to map the human genome returned $140 to our economy — every dollar," the president said. "Today, our scientists are mapping the human brain to unlock the answers to Alzheimer's."

Read more

4:53pm

Sun March 31, 2013
History

Living Memories From The Last Days Of Alcatraz

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 6:28 pm

Alcatraz, the infamous prison, still captures the imagination 50 years after it closed. Those who did time there, however, don't have to wonder.
Leigh Wiener Courtesy Devik Wiener

Fifty years ago, the notorious Alcatraz prison shut its gate behind guard Jim Albright as he escorted the last inmate off the island on March 21, 1963.

"As we're going out, I know, when I come back from this trip, I don't have a job, I don't have a home anymore," Albright remembers. "I didn't want the island to close, I didn't want to leave. I liked it there."

Read more

Pages