Erin Keane covers Louisville's vibrant arts and humanities scene for WFPL. She also offers commentary on the latest in pop culture news for WFPK's The Weekly Feed. A former newspaper theater critic and arts writer, she has lived in Louisville since 1994 and is a graduate of the Kentucky Governor's School for the Arts, Bellarmine University's communications program and Spalding University's graduate creative writing program. 

5:03pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Movie Reviews

Past Pains, Buried Deep 'Down The Shore'

The mysterious Jacques (Edoardo Costa, left) upends Bailey's (James Gandolfini) life when he arrives in the latter's seaside New Jersey town in Down the Shore.
Transmission Pictures

If you want to tell a story, the professional tale-spinners say, make something happen.

That's true, but a happening can be defined as elastically as the teller needs it to be. Sometimes it's a shift in a character's inner landscape — a change in her responses to the common hurts and losses that she's lugged around from childhood — that moves us more than a third-act gunshot ever could.

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5:03pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Movie Reviews

Gruesome 'Evil Dead' Does Right By Its Namesake

David (Shiloh Fernandez), Olivia (Jessica Lucas) and Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) fall victim to demonic terrors in the gritty horror remake Evil Dead.
Kirsty Griffin TriStar Pictures

Let's just get this out of the way up front: Fede Alvarez's remake of Sam Raimi's horror classic The Evil Dead can't hold a candle, shotgun or revving chainsaw to the original.

Raimi's 1981 debut is a masterpiece of punk filmmaking, a bunch of young enthusiasts who barely knew what they were doing, going out into the woods and stumbling blindly into the creation of a ragged landmark — largely because they didn't know, didn't care or didn't have the money to do it the way it was supposed to be done.

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5:03pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Teapot' Jackpot? Newlyweds Feel Fiscal Hurt In Dark Comedy

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 6:05 pm

Temple gives Alice a sharp edge, but the character's persona wears thin by the end of the film.
Angela Graves Magnolia Pictures

In theory, it's romantic to watch young couples struggling. We're used to seeing 'em in movies from the '30s, '40s and onward: He makes only enough money to put beans, not steak, on the table. She stretches the meager dollars he brings home by whipping up cheerful curtains patched together from fabric scraps. They may be poor, but they have love on their side, and if they work together, a comfortable and happy life — including the babies that will eventually come — will be theirs.

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5:03pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Before And After' Dinner, Andre Is Still Talking

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:27 pm

In his wife's new documentary, theatrical director Andre Gregory comes across as an eternal child, hooked on his capacity to enchant but rarely able to listen to anyone else.
Cinema Guild

In 1981, avant-garde theater director Andre Gregory collaborated with his friend Wallace Shawn and French filmmaker Louis Malle on an oddball project they called My Dinner with Andre.

Now enshrined as a classic — and one of the most-lampooned films in the history of American cinema — the movie is a talky two-hander in which Gregory (or someone very like him) gassed away about his globe-trotting adventures in spiritual enlightenment, while Shawn (or someone very like him) listened in disbelief, then grew entranced.

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5:03pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Movie Reviews

'Trance': Crime Pays, If You Remember Where The Stash Is

Franck (Vincent Cassel), Simon (James McAvoy) and Elizabeth (Rosario Dawson) are uneasy allies trying to discover exactly what went wrong during a botched art heist in Danny Boyle's trippy thriller Trance.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

The rampant trippiness of Danny Boyle's movies is what makes them so enjoyable — and, sometimes, so annoying.

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5:03pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Movie Reviews

Robert Redford Keeps Revolutionary'Company'

Jim (Robert Redford) must flee with his daughter, Isabel (Jackie Evancho), to the scene of a past crime in order to avoid a probing amateur reporter.
Doane Gregory Sony Pictures Classics

Crisp in execution and classic in ambiance, The Company You Keep is star Robert Redford's most persuasive directorial work since 1994's Quiz Show. It's a pleasure to watch, even if the payoff is rather less substantial than the backstory.

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5:02pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Remembrances

For Pulitzer-Winning Critic Roger Ebert, Films Were A Journey

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Ebert works in his office at the WTTW-TV studios in Chicago on Jan. 12, 2011.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

He won a Pulitzer Prize for his writing, but just as influential as his print essays were his "thumbs up" and "thumbs down" movie reviews. Film critic Roger Ebert died Thursday after struggling for years with cancer. He was 70 years old.

His thumb may have made him famous on TV, but Ebert was first and foremost a print journalist. He worked on newspapers in grade school, high school and college. With his acumen for writing came a love of movies — and on July 12, 2005, proclaimed Roger Ebert Day by the city of Chicago, he told a crowd of admirers why movies matter.

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5:02pm

Thu April 4, 2013
It's All Politics

Oregon Weighs Own Gun Measures After Mall Shooting, Newtown

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Gun rights supporters rally at the Oregon Capitol in February.
Chris Lehman Northwest News Network

Oregon state lawmakers have scheduled a marathon public hearing Friday on four gun control bills. The proposals include a ban on guns in schools and criminal background checks for private gun sales.

Opponents are lining up against the measures, but some gun control advocates say the proposals don't go far enough.

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5:02pm

Thu April 4, 2013
Theater

'Sleep Rock Thy Brain' Play Uses Science As Inspiration

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now a more subjective study of dreams. It comes from the Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Kentucky. The festival was founded by Actors Theatre of Louisville. And each year, that theater commissions a new work for its company of apprentice actors. This year's show, a series of three one-act plays, is called "Sleep Rock Thy Brain."

Erin Keane of member station WFPL got a front row seat.

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