3:29pm

Tue April 2, 2013
It's All Politics

Seeking Forgiveness And A House Seat, Sanford Again Faces GOP Voters

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 10:23 am

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford faces former Charleston County Councilman Curtis Bostic in the GOP primary runoff Tuesday. The winner will represent Republicans in a May 7 special election for a U.S. House seat.
Bruce Smith AP

Update at 8:41 p.m. ET Sanford Wins Runoff

Former Gov. Mark Sanford, whose political career was derailed four years ago by his admission of an extramarital affair, has won the GOP nomination for the U.S. House seat he once held, reports The Associated Press. Note at 8:10 a.m. Wednesday: Sanford won with about 57 percent of the vote. (We mistakenly said earlier that he won "by" about 57 percent.)

Read more

3:13pm

Tue April 2, 2013
Europe

Once Championed By Putin, Medvedev Falls Precipitously Out Of Favor

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:56 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, heads a State Council session alongside Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev in Moscow last year. Increasing political attacks on Medvedev have accompanied Putin's suspicions about his erstwhile partner's ambitions.
Yekaterina Shtukina AP

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev appears increasingly isolated from the centers of power surrounding President Vladimir Putin.

Analysts say Medvedev is the target of a campaign to wreck his reputation and drive him from office. It's a risky situation for the former president, who was once regarded as Putin's partner.

The attacks have come from many directions. One of the harshest was an anonymous, documentary-style film that was posted on the Internet in January.

Read more

David Dye is a longtime Philadelphia radio personality whose music enthusiasm has captivated listeners of World Cafe® since 1991. World Cafeis produced by WXPN, the public radio service of the University of Pennsylvania.

2:41pm

Tue April 2, 2013
The Two-Way

DNA-Mapped Furniture Really Ties The Room Together — With You

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 3:53 pm

The Darwin Table is created from a person's unique DNA profile.
Tjep. via Wired Magazine

Furnishing a new apartment or house can be tough; sometimes you just can't find that end table or couch that is uniquely "you."

Well, as Wired reports, a Dutch design studio is trying to change that.

Read more

2:30pm

Tue April 2, 2013
World Cafe

Kail Baxley: Music From An Amateur Boxer Who Danced For James Brown

Kail Baxley.
Courtesy of the artist

When Kail Baxley was a kid growing up in Williston, S.C., James Brown used to challenge him to dance-offs. Baxley didn't win so much. He did better as an amateur boxer — his key to getting out of the small town and traveling to Europe and Africa.

Read more

2:29pm

Tue April 2, 2013
The Salt

Fruit, Not Fries: Lunchroom Makeovers Nudge Kids Toward Better Choices

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 4:49 pm

Students select blueberries and rolls from the food line at Lincoln Elementary in Olympia, Wash., in 2004.
John Froschauer AP

Gone are the days of serving up tater tots and French toast sticks to students. Here are the days of carrot sticks and quinoa.

New nutritional guidelines, announced in 2012, require public school lunchrooms to offer more whole grains, low-fat milk and fewer starchy sides like french fries. But short of stationing grandmothers in every cafeteria, how do you ensure that students actually eat the fruits and veggies they're being offered?

Read more

2:03pm

Tue April 2, 2013
Science

The Buzz On Bees: Why Many Colonies Are Collapsing

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 2:57 pm

Bees have been dying off in increasing numbers over the past few years. Experts say that habitat loss and disease are the biggest culprits, and some believe that pesticides are to blame. NPR science correspondent Dan Charles explains the possible causes and what is being done to stop this trend.

1:58pm

Tue April 2, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Sing, Fly, Mate, Die — Here Come The Cicadas!

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 12:33 pm

Joel Anderson Copyright 2013 Anderson Design Group

If you live in Missouri, they've already gone.

But back East, cicadas are about to climb out of their little holes in the ground, wriggle out of their skins, like this ...

... so after 17 years of getting ready, they can now do the thing they hope, hope, hope to do — which is, if at all possible, make a baby.

Read more

1:48pm

Tue April 2, 2013
The Two-Way

U.N. Approves Treaty To Regulate Multibillion-Dollar Global Arms Trade

Delegates to the United Nations General Assembly applaud the passage of the first U.N. treaty regulating the international arms trade on Tuesday.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

The United Nations General Assembly overwhelmingly approved the first U.N. treaty to regulate the estimated $60 billion global arms trade on Tuesday.

The goal of the Arms Trade Treaty, which the U.N. has sought for over a decade, according to The Associated Press, is to keep illicit weapons out of the hands of terrorists, insurgent fighters and organized crime.

The vote on the treaty was 154-3, with 23 abstentions.

Read more

1:32pm

Tue April 2, 2013
The Salt

From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 2:00 pm

Guinea pigs on the grill
Courtesy of Curtiss Calleo

You may best know the guinea pig as a nervous little pet that lives in a cage and eats alfalfa pellets.

Now, the rodents are increasingly showing up on plates in the United States.

Read more

Pages