3:03am

Thu August 1, 2013
Business

Firm Hopes 'Owning Nashville' Will Pay Off For Investors

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:23 am

A new fund trading on the New York Stock Exchange will allow investors to put money in companies that all call Nashville home. The manager's of the fund hope to expand the project to other cities.
Walter G. Arce CSM /Landov

There's a hot stock tip floating around Nashville, and it's a first-of-its-kind investment fund that begins trading on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday.

The fund is a collection of stocks in publicly traded companies that have one thing in common: the city they call home.

When people buy into the Nashville Area Exchange Traded Fund — which starts trading at $25 a share — they will essentially be placing a bet based on an area code.

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3:02am

Thu August 1, 2013
Business

As Back-To-School Shopping Begins, Consumers May Turn Frugal

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

Chris Viehland helps her daughter Jenna try on shoes for the new school year at a Famous Footwear store in Fenton, Mo., Aug. 9, 2012.
Christian Gooden MCT/Landov

As August begins, retailers are stepping up sales promotions to attract back-to-school shoppers. And several states are offering tax-free shopping to encourage purchases.

But most economists say this year's sales will be slower than last summer's because consumers have been coping with more expensive gasoline and higher payroll taxes.

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3:01am

Thu August 1, 2013
Code Switch

To '60s Civil Rights Hero, Math Is Kids' Formula For Success

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

Bob Moses works with Jennifer Augustine, Guitoscard Denize, Darius Collins and other students who are part of this Algebra Project classroom. It's one of several student cohorts across the country where students who've struggled with math get to college-level by the end of high school.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Bob Moses is 78, but he has the same probing eyes you see behind thick black glasses in photos from 50 years ago when he worked as a civil rights activist in Mississippi. The son of a janitor, Moses was born and raised in Harlem. He's a Harvard-trained philosopher and a veteran teacher.

He started a math training program — the Algebra Project — with a MacArthur "Genius Grant" 30 years ago. The goal is simple: Take students who score the worst on state math tests, double up on the subject for four years and get them ready to do college-level math by the end of high school.

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3:01am

Thu August 1, 2013
Crime In The City

Bodies On The Boardwalk: Murder Stirs A Sleepy Jersey Shore

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

The Jersey shore's iconic Star Jet roller coaster was inundated after Superstorm Sandy.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

When writer Chris Grabenstein plots his mysteries, the murders happen in the corny nooks of New Jersey's Jersey shore. After all, there's something delightfully cheesy about a beach town.

"I guess I'm a cheesy guy. I like this kind of stuff," Grabenstein says. "Ever since I was a kid I loved tourist towns."

The author points out shop names as we walk along his stretch of the shore. There's the Sunglass Menagerie, an ice cream shop called Do Me A Flavor, Shore Good Donuts and How You Brewin' coffee. I'll spare you the rest — Long Beach Island has 18 miles of this stuff.

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3:00am

Thu August 1, 2013
Books

How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:03 pm

Carnegie ultimately gave away $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country. "In bestowing charity the main consideration should be to help those who help themselves," he wrote.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Andrew Carnegie was once the richest man in the world. Coming as a dirt poor kid from Scotland to the U.S., by the 1880s he'd built an empire in steel — and then gave it all away: $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country.

Carnegie donated $300,000 to build Washington, D.C.'s oldest library — a beautiful beaux arts building that dates back to 1903. Inscribed above the doorway are the words: Science, Poetry, History. The building was "dedicated to the diffusion of knowledge."

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3:00am

Thu August 1, 2013
All Tech Considered

Beyond .Com: Some See Confusion In Internet Domain Expansion

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:23 am

Suffixes like .org, .net and .com are the most common on the Internet today. But the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, which governs Web names, plans to add some 1,400 more, some ending in Arabic or Chinese characters.
iStockphoto.com

Starting this fall, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, will begin rolling out 20 new suffixes, or top-level domains, every week. This will create new entrepreneurial opportunities, says ICANN CEO Fadi Chehade.

"Diversity to the domain name system is coming," he says.

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8:52pm

Wed July 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Sold! First Parcels Auctioned For Future Offshore Wind Farms

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

The offshore wind farm in the North Sea near Borkum, Germany, is nearly complete. The Riffgat facility, seen here on June 23, includes 30 turbines, each with a generating capacity of 3.6 megawatts.
David Hecker Getty Images

A Rhode Island company was the highest bidder in the federal government's first-ever auction for the right to build an offshore wind farm.

After 11 rounds, Deepwater Wind outbid two other companies for two patches of ocean off the coasts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The winning bid was $3.8 million.

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7:43pm

Wed July 31, 2013
It's All Politics

Obama's Fed Pick Quandary: What Does It Mean For His Legacy?

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 9:56 am

Janet Yellen, vice chairwoman of the Federal Reserve, is under consideration to become the first woman to lead the Fed. President Obama reportedly is likely to choose between Yellen and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers.
Franck Robichon EPA/Landov

Of all the legacies presidents leave behind, few are as important — yet as poorly understood in the moment — as their picks for chairman of the Federal Reserve.

Paul Volcker, credited with taming double-digit inflation through backbreaking high interest rates that contributed to the recession of the early 1980s, was among President Jimmy Carter's most consequential appointments.

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7:30pm

Wed July 31, 2013
The Two-Way

House Votes To Cut Student Loan Rate, Sends Bill To Obama

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 8:08 pm

The Republican-controlled House on Wednesday overwhelmingly approved a bipartisan bill to cut the cost of borrowing for federal student loans, sending the measure to President Obama for his signature.

The bill, which had easily passed the Democratic-controlled Senate last week, would retroactively cut higher rates — which on July 1 had jumped to at least 6.8 percent.

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7:10pm

Wed July 31, 2013
WVAS Local

WVAS Local News

The Montgomery County Board of Education approved a plan that will allow the Loveless Academic Magnet Program and the Montgomery Technical Education Center to move to the former Montgomery Mall over the next two years.  LAMP will occupy the old Parisian's building and MTEC will call the former JC Penny's site home.  The Central Office Operations Complex is also moving to the location.  The 20-acre site will include physical education facilities , a baseball field, green spaces and parking. 

Sworn In

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