7:53am

Fri August 2, 2013
Europe

Berlusconi Vows To Fight Back After Tax Conviction

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

The front pages of the main Italian newspapers in Rome on Friday after Italy's top court upheld a jail sentence against former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi for tax fraud.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

After some 20 trials over two decades, Italian media tycoon Silvio Berlusconi received his first definitive conviction Thursday for evading almost $10 million in taxes while he was prime minister.

After more than seven hours of deliberations, Judge Antonio Esposito read the ruling of the five Supreme Court judges: "In the name of the Italian people," the judge declared, "Berlusconi's conviction and prison term are irrevocable."

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7:23am

Fri August 2, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Battle Rages On In Amazon Vs. Overstock Price War

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:51 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:10am

Fri August 2, 2013
The Two-Way

U.S. Embassies To Close Sunday, And Possibly Beyond, For Safety

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:46 pm

Few details have emerged about the U.S. plan to shut down embassies that would normally be open this Sunday. A senior State Department official says that the U.S. facilities may be closed for more days, as well. The closures are being described as "precautionary steps" that are being taken "out of an abundance of caution."

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6:50am

Fri August 2, 2013
Business

Bank Of America May Face Charges Related To Financial Crisis

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with new trouble for B of A.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: In a regulatory filing yesterday, Bank of America revealed it may be facing civil charges over its activities during the financial crisis. The bank disclosed an investigation by the Department of Justice related to residential mortgage-backed securities. Bank of America says it's cooperating. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:53am

Fri August 2, 2013
Arts & Life

Spoiler Alert: Spoilers May Not Be That Bad

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When you check social media and you're not caught up on your favorite TV show, say, you never know when you might encounter a spoiler. Somebody on Twitter, some blog says too much about what happened in a plot line. My big spoiler moment came when I saw a post about a death on "Downton Abbey" and I thought that everything was just ruined. But is it really that bad when this happens? NPR's Neda Ulaby has this encore story about how spoilers might actually make you enjoy something more.

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5:41am

Fri August 2, 2013
Politics

Reid Requests Talkative Senators 'Shut Up'

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now to a group that was not in a mood to comply.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

You know how school kids can get as summer break is getting closer: a little rowdy.

MONTAGNE: Not how you'd normally describe the U.S. Senate, which is widely considered the more gentile congressional body. But tempers flared yesterday when Senators Patty Murray and Susan Collins had the floor and were trying to talk about transportation spending, but were being not just ignored, but drowned out by talkative colleagues.

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3:18am

Fri August 2, 2013
The Salt

Massachusetts Revives The Lost Art Of Making Sea Salt

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

The Martha's Vineyard beach where Heidi Feldman collects saltwater to make sea salt.
Courtesy of Heidi Feldman

"Look for a house, barn, paddock, barking dogs and screeching peacocks."

Those were Heidi Feldman's instructions to me to find Down Island Farm in Vineyard Haven on Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

She forgot to mention the ram, free roaming chickens and miniature horse. But I managed to find it anyway.

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3:18am

Fri August 2, 2013
StoryCorps

A Mother And Son Live, And Cope, With Mental Illness

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Liza Long's son, 13, struggles with rage and violent outbursts. After the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., Long wrote a blog post advocating for better care for mentally ill youth.
StoryCorps

One day after the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., last December, Liza Long wrote a blog post urging the country to focus on treatment for the nation's mentally ill youth. In it, she shared the story of her own son, "Michael" (not his real name). "I live with a son who is mentally ill," she wrote for The Blue Review.

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3:17am

Fri August 2, 2013
Planet Money

4 Reasons Why Millions Of Americans Are Leaving The Workforce

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

NPR

The unemployment rate only includes people who don't have jobs and are looking for work. A much larger swath of people — about 36 percent of U.S. adults — don't have jobs and aren't looking for work at all. That figure is higher than it's been in decades (and, conversely, the share of adults in the labor force — shown in the graph above — is lower than it's been in decades).

Here are four reasons why so many people are leaving the labor force.

1. They're retiring.

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3:17am

Fri August 2, 2013
Environment

Our Once And Future Oceans: Taking Lessons From Earth's Past

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:48 pm

Changes to the acidity of the Earth's ancient oceans affected the coral reefs more than 50 million years ago. And researchers are using that information to try to predict how the planet might fare in our rapidly changing climate. Above, the Wheeler Reef section of the Great Barrier Reef.
Auscape UIG via Getty Images

One of the most powerful ways to figure out how the Earth will respond to all the carbon dioxide we're putting into the atmosphere is to look back into the planet's history.

Paleontologists have spent a lot of time trying to understand a time, more than 50 million years ago, when the planet was much hotter than it is today. They're finding that the news isn't all bad when you take the long view.

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