WVAS Local News

   Montgomery police have now charged a juvenile male with reckless murder and assault in connection with a fatal shooting yesterday. In a press conference police revealed that a 9 year old boy was killed and a 16 year old was wounded in the incident that occurred at a home in the 17-hundred block of Coral Lane which is located near Norman Bridge Road. The 16 year old’s injuries were not life-threatening. Captain Regina Duckett says that reckless murder charges can be brought regardless of the intent. The juvenile was placed in the Montgomery County Youth Detention Facility.

   The inundation from Tropical Storm Cindy has caused significant crop losses in Alabama. As a result, Governor Kay Ivey is asking for federal assistance for farmers. The governor has requested that some Alabama counties be given a disaster declaration. The letter she sent to U-S Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue claims that a number of Alabama’s Agricultural producers have incurred great losses because of the storm.The state’s Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries John McMillan says the cotton, corn, hay, peanuts and soybean crops were most adversely affected.

Alabama State University Interim-President Dr. Leon C. Wilson, leadership members and staff visited the birth place of ASU on Wednesday. The former school was founded on July 17, 1867 in Marion; and is widely seen as the site where nine former slaves collected $500 to establish Lincoln Normal School, which is now Alabama State University. “This is our 150th year of existence and in this very spot is where it all started with nine brave people who decided that they were going to start an educational institution,” said Wilson.

Hyles Files: Imperfect Offerings

Jun 22, 2017

Alabama to Stop Giving ACT Aspire Test

Jun 22, 2017

Alabama will stop giving the ACT Aspire test to students. The state Board of Education voted unanimously Wednesday not to renew the contract with the company. Superintendent Michael Sentance said there were "several issues" with the last administration of the test. He said test results were delayed and when the state received them some of the data was bad. Alabama in 2014 began using the ACT Aspire system as the annual reading and math assessment for grades three through eight in public schools. The transition came with years of disappointing scores.

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Queen Elizabeth II is set to get a raise, with much of the money going toward sprucing up Buckingham Palace, reports the BBC.

The annual so-called Sovereign Grant is ballooning to £82 million (or $105 million) up 8 percent from last year. In addition to palace upkeep, it goes toward staff salaries and official travel.

Emmett Till Sign Vandalized Again

19 hours ago

An Emmett Till historical marker in Money, Miss., has been vandalized two times in as many months, most recently last week, when panels with the 14-year-old's image and his story were peeled off.

Installed in 2011, the sign stands on the Mississippi Freedom Trail, which commemorates people, places and events that played a part in the civil rights movement.

A watchdog group says a top Trump appointee violated a federal law by retweeting one of President Trump's tweets.

In a letter sent Tuesday to the Office of Special Counsel, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) requested an investigation into whether the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, improperly used Twitter for political activity.

Since Senate Republicans released the draft of their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act last week, many people have been wondering how the proposed changes will affect their own coverage, and their family's: Will my pre-existing condition be covered? Will my premiums go up or down?

The bill is still a work in progress, but we've taken a sampling of questions from All Things Considered listeners and answered them, based on what we know now.

What would it cost to protect the nation's voting systems from attack? About $400 million would go a long way, say cybersecurity experts. It's not a lot of money when it comes to national defense — the Pentagon spent more than that last year on military bands alone — but getting funds for election systems is always a struggle.

A grand jury indicted three Chicago police officers on felony charges on Tuesday, accusing them of conspiring to cover up the facts of a fatal police shooting in October 2014 of a black teenager in order to shield their fellow officer.

Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is white, shot 17-year-old Laquan McDonald 16 times, according to prosecutors.

A federal judge is ordering Alabama to improve the way it treats mentally ill prisoners after ruling that the state fails to provide constitutionally adequate mental health care in state lockups.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson of Montgomery says Alabama is putting prisoners' lives at risk with "horrendously inadequate" care and a lack of services for inmates with psychiatric problems.

The director John Woo, whose filmography contains an aggregate body count in the quadruple digits, has frequently observed that action movies and musicals are close cousins. He's right about that, and I offer into evidence Edgar Wright's intoxicating new chase flick Baby Driver as Exhibit A.

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