WVAS Local News

Officer-Involved Shooting in Macon County

Apr 20, 2017

An officer was involved in a shooting in Macon County yesterday. A release from the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency indicates that a Macon County Sheriff’s Department official fired a weapon at a suspect on U-S Highway 80 near Tuskegee. It happened not far from the Brownsville Community. The circumstances of the shooting were not given. Authorities say the suspect was taken to Columbus Medical Center with gunshot wounds, but the extent of those injuries wasn’t disclosed. The State Bureau of Investigation is handling the case.

 Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore lost his effort to regain his job today as the Alabama Supreme Court upheld his suspension for urging defiance of the federal courts' landmark rulings allowing gays and lesbians to marry. Moore's fate was in the hands of specially appointed judges who were selected at random after his colleagues on the state's highest court recused themselves, and these judges upheld both the findings that Moore violated judicial ethics with his actions and his suspension for the remainder of his term.

   The recent Facebook murder victim, Robert Godwin, has an Alabama State University connection. Godwin’s cousin Waynetta Callen attends ASU as a theater major. She attended a vigil in his honor today at the university. Several students and faculty gave remarks. Godwin was murdered on Easter Sunday and a video of the crime was placed on Facebook by the alleged shooter. Godwin will be laid to rest Friday in Ohio. 

The first of three engagement forums was held last night for parents and teachers to ask questions regarding the state intervention of Montgomery Public Schools. State Department of Education officials were on hand to detail how the intervention will work, including State Schools Superintendent Michael Sentance. Sentance says it will take several years to return the system to a desired level of academic performance. In all, 27 schools within the system are being taken over by the state, while the rest remain under the supervision of the Montgomery Public School System.

Woman Arrested in Sunday Night Murder

Apr 17, 2017

   Montgomery police have made an arrest in a Sunday night homicide. According to a release, police say 19 year old Caleb Royal was shot while in the 4-thousand block of Amesbury Drive. Royal was taken to Baptist Medical Center South where he was later pronounced dead. Detectives have charged 26 year old Latoya Sanders of Montgomery with murder in connection with the shooting. The incident reportedly stemmed from an argument the victim had earlier in the day with a third individual known to both parties.

Anti Violence Town Hall/Block Party

90.7 Perspectives is Taking It to the Streets, AGAIN!

90.7 Perspectives and the award winning WVAS-FM news team, will hold an Anti-Violence/Town Hall Block Party on April 26 at Sidney Lanier High School

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Not long ago, both the Economist and the New Yorker magazines featured unflattering cover portraits of President Trump holding a golf club. Both seemed to suggest the president had found himself in a rough patch.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Inside a tiny, hard-to-find storefront in Brooklyn lies the darkly whimsical world of a most unusual "candy alchemist."

He calls himself "Eugene J.," and this real-life Willy Wonka is whipping up his own new confections across town from where Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will open on Broadway later this month.

Not much is known about this quiet man in black, who prefers to keep the focus on the candy. Behind a purple satin curtain, he toils away on his latest invention.

The 700 cows on Brett Reinford's dairy farm are making more than just milk.

Each day, the girls are producing 7,000 gallons of manure. And that smells exactly like you'd imagine. "We had gotten complaints from neighbors in the past that had said, 'Hey, it stinks too much. Can you do something about it?' " Reinford says.

So he looked around for a solution and landed on a device called a digester. A digester tamps down the smell a bit, but, more importantly, it takes all that cow poop and converts it to electricity.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the third post-election visit with Jamie Ruppert, 33, of White Haven, Pa.

Jamie Ruppert, 33, switched parties and voted for Donald Trump in November, and for months has been his enthusiastic supporter.

With student debt at a staggering $1.3 trillion, many families are facing a huge financial dilemma: Their final springtime decisions about college enrollment and acceptance. The NPR Ed team teamed up with Weekend Edition to answer some listener questions about debt and degrees.

Waiting on the numbers

Marcy, from Union City, N.J. has twin girls going off to college in September.

With any new president, there's a learning curve. But for President Trump, it's been steeper than others.

"Mount Everest" is how Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, described it ahead of Trump's 100th day in office, which is coming up Saturday, April 29. "It's as steep as they come and ice-covered, and he didn't bring very many knowledgeable Sherpas with him."

Can all hope be lost?

I used to think not.

I used to think that no matter how tough life gets for people, they always have hope to cling to – to get them through it.

Then I met some Rohingya refugees on a trip to Bangladesh last month. Reporter Michael Sullivan and I were there to report on the latest wave of the Muslim minority group to flee over the border from Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

Nasir Abdullahi is sitting in a mall in downtown Abuja, sipping fresh juice and eating plantain chips. Small, distinguished with an embroidered cap, Nasir looks like your typical Northern Nigerian businessman, but he's also a farmer.

A few years ago he got a call from an employee on his millet farm in Jigawa, Nigeria.

"He was even crying when he called me," Abdullahi says. "I said, 'Talk!' He said, 'There is something serious, there is something serious!' I said, 'Did anybody die? What is it?' He said, 'No, it's cattle herdsmen.'"

His Teacher Told Him He Wouldn't Go To College, Then He Did

Apr 23, 2017

One day Ronnie Sidney, from Tappahannock, Va., was goofing off with his classmates in math when one of them threw a football at the board — and it landed a little too close to the teacher. Sidney says the ninth-grade teacher, visibly frustrated, turned around and said, " 'None of you are going to college.' "

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