WVAS Local News

Hyles Files: Not Listening

6 hours ago

Strange and Moore Headed to September Runoff

6 hours ago

Sen. Luther Strange and former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore are headed to a Republican primary runoff to fill the U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The two men, who represent different factions within the Alabama Republican Party, will face off in a Sept. 26 runoff. Strange was appointed to the Senate seat in February by then governor Robert Bentley. He was unable to escape a runoff despite being buoyed by an endorsement by President Donald Trump. Moore harnessed his support among evangelical voters to secure a spot in the runoff.

Polls have opened across Alabama as voters cast ballots in party primary elections for the U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Republican Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed to fill the post temporarily, is seeking to fight off challengers that include former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks. President Donald Trump has endorsed Strange and recorded automatic phone calls on his behalf. Brooks has criticized Strange's backing by a super political action committee tied to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

   Alabama Schools Superintendent Michael Sentance provided his response yesterday to an unflattering evaluation from the State Board of Education. Last month all but one board member gave the superintendent low marks for his job performance thus far. Sentance told the board his administration already has a string of accomplishments. Some of the achievements Sentance touted include creating the first office of school improvement, creating a strategic improvement plan and developing plans to better teacher education programs.

   Montgomery Police have arrested two people in connection with a homicide from last year. The fatal shooting happened in the 300 block of Burgwyn Road on November 12 of 2016. That’s where 31 year old Jacurtis Howard was found shot to death. Police have now charged 29 year old Raheem Brown and 20 year John Turner with capital murder in the incident. The two Montgomery men are being held in the Montgomery County Detention Facility without bond. Investigators believe Howard was shot during the course of being robbed. 

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Hope Hicks, one of President Trump's rarely seen but longest-serving aides, has been named interim White House communications director, filling the position left vacant by Anthony Scaramucci after his 10-day tenure.

Hicks will work alongside press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders until a permanent replacement is found, the White House said. She has been serving as director of strategic communications.

"We will make an announcement on a permanent communications director at the appropriate time," a White House official said.

A few years ago in Zambia, hippos were dropping dead by the dozens. Soon after the hippos fell ill, people started getting sick, too.

Between August and September of 2011, at least 85 hippos died in a game management area along the South Luangwa River near the border with Malawi. It turns out the hippos were the victims of anthrax, the same bacteria used in a series of letter attacks that killed five people in the weeks after Sept. 11. The anthrax outbreaks in hippos and humans in Zambia however, weren't part of some sinister terrorist plot. Instead, they were driven by hunger.

President Trump roiled opinion Tuesday by reversing himself and reiterating his claim that "both sides" of a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., were to blame for violence that killed one woman and left many injured.

Trump made the remarks at a news conference at Trump Tower in New York, engaging in back-and-forth exchanges with reporters about what transpired in Charlottesville over the weekend.

To walk around Berlin is to constantly, inevitably, trip over history.

Almost literally, in the case of the Stolpersteine, or "stumbling stones," embedded in the sidewalks outside homes where victims of the Holocaust once lived.

Germany's culture of "remembrance" around the Nazi years and the Holocaust is a well-documented and essential part of the nation's character. Though occasionally political parties may challenge it, those elements have thus far remained thoroughly fringe.

Hyles Files: Not Listening

6 hours ago

Strange and Moore Headed to September Runoff

6 hours ago

Sen. Luther Strange and former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore are headed to a Republican primary runoff to fill the U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The two men, who represent different factions within the Alabama Republican Party, will face off in a Sept. 26 runoff. Strange was appointed to the Senate seat in February by then governor Robert Bentley. He was unable to escape a runoff despite being buoyed by an endorsement by President Donald Trump. Moore harnessed his support among evangelical voters to secure a spot in the runoff.

The former president's message after the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was brief, but it hit the right note for many.

"No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion ... ," Barack Obama tweeted, accompanied by a photo of himself, jacket slung over his shoulder, smiling at four young children gathered at a windowsill.

"So this week it's Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson's coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop? ... [Jefferson] was a major slave owner. Are we going to take down his statue?" — President Trump, Aug. 15, 2017

On the same night that torch-bearing white nationalists wound up staging a rally at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Van Jones stood at a podium, in the nation's capital, telling a theater full of supporters why they should let love rule in the face of racial hatred.

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